General Arts and Science - 230

Ontario College Certificate
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Overview

This program is designed to offer transfer pathways to additional College and University programs.

  • Experience the benefits of a program designed as a bridge to help you choose the right path.
  • Choose from a wide selection of course options for future studies in Business, Health Sciences, Social Sciences, Human Services and other college and university programs.
  • Gain both a good grounding in academic skills, and exposure to a wide variety of academic disciplines.
  • Acquire a well-rounded general education and develop skills in Humanities and Social Sciences.

View courses available under Program of Studies.

You do not need to apply to begin this program, simply ensure you meet the admission requirements (listed on the Admission & Registration tab) and then you may register for any available courses.

Interested in taking a single course? No problem. Provided you have the appropriate prerequisites, these courses can be taken individually or as part of the full program.

Program Contact
CE Interdisciplinary, Media, Creative and Business
  • Grade 10 Mathematics (D or P) or equivalent is recommended for students taking Math and Science courses.

You do not need to apply to begin this program. Start by ensuring you meet the admission requirements listed above and then register for the courses listed in the Program of Studies when they are offered.  Some courses have prerequisites, so please check the Program of Studies for details. Find out how to register for a course.

The program of studies displayed below applies to students starting the program in the current academic year. Students who began in other academic years may require different courses to be eligible to graduate. If you have questions regarding a strategy for completion contact Continuing Education - Interdisciplinary, Creative, Media and Business.

Visit the Mohawk College Bookstore Textbook Search (opens in new window) for information on textbooks.

Click on the course number below to check current availability and for registration information

Mandatory Courses

Course Number Course Name Course Description
CREDAS101 First Year Foundations

Build important analytical, creative, and practical skills that promote personal, academic, and employment success. Identify appropriate strategies to help you adapt to change, clarify and achieve educational and career goals, manage time, and balance priorities for personal development and academic benefit. Increase your digital literacy skills and develop new strategies for organizing information, evaluating/citing scholarly source material and academic research, and engaging in college-level research and writing. 42 hours. Equivalent: CRED10106.

SSCI10051 Introduction to Critical Thinking Learn a variety of techniques that are used to gather, interpret, and evaluate information. Emphasis will be placed on the skills required to think critically, reason clearly, and communicate effectively. 42 hours.
COMM10368 Advanced Academic Writing Develop awareness and skill in achieving clarity, coherence, and precision in writing academic essays. Employ critical thinking techniques while reading and analyzing a variety of essay styles. Plan, outline, and write various styles of academic essays. Apply the skills of revision, editing, and proofreading to academic essays. 42 hours.
PSOLAS301 Inquiry Use the inquiry process to identify, formulate, analyse, and evaluate a problem or issue, considering the context in which the issue occurs. Determine the historical, social, and political implications and assess the impacts of the issue. Formulate sound research questions and collect and analyse data through experiential learning opportunities. Recognize ethical issues in a variety of settings and the value of intellectual integrity, moral behaviour, and social and civic responsibility. 42 hours.

Option Group 1 – Choose 1

COMM11040 Communication D Communication is an introductory college level English course. Through a variety of assignments, successful students in this course will develop the reading, writing, critical and analytical skills essential to them as communicators in college and upon graduation. This course teaches writing through the critical reading of various fiction and non-fiction material and brings students with basic skills to college level foundational skills. 56 hours. Equivalent: COMM10045 or COMM10050 or COMMLL008 or TEMPLL041 or COMMLL223 or COMM10100 or COMMLL044 or COMMLL126 or COMM10187 or COMM10332 or COMM10256 or COMM10351 or COMM11049.
COMMLL041 Communication

Communication is an introductory college level English course. Students exiting this course will demonstrate competence in grammar, sentence structure, and writing skills. Successful students in this course will develop the reading, writing, critical and analytical skills essential to them as communicators in college and upon graduation. This course teaches writing through the critical reading of various fiction and non-fiction material and brings students to college level foundation skills. 42 hours. Equivalent: COMM10045 or COMM10050 or COMMLL008 or TEMPLL041 or COMMLL223 or COMM10100 or COMMLL044 or COMMLL126 or COMM10187 or COMM10332 or COMM10256 or COMM10351 or COMM11049.

Option Group 2 – Choose 2

ANTR10000 Plagues and People: A History of Disease and Medicine

Identify basic disease causing organisms and the role sociocultural factors have upon the emergence and transmission of disease. Survey the various forms of medicine, and important healers, in prehistory and history. Investigate the role epidemic disease has played in shaping sociocultural behaviour, medicine, and society. Explore the quantitative and qualitative research findings regarding human disease and medicine. Identify the varieties of medicine (e.g., traditional, folk, and biological) and approaches to health and sickness in human societies. 42 hours. Equivalent: SSCI10005.

ANTR10001 Introduction to Anthropology

Examine how humans have changed biologically, culturally, and socially over time. Investigate new research and insights into humankind through physical, archaeological, and sociocultural approaches. Explore the interrelationship between the environment, humans, and culture. Critically examine the origins and diversity of primates, humans, culture, economic systems, families, kinship, marriage, language, magic and religion. 42 hours. Equivalent: SSCIAS107.

BIOL10006 Preparatory Biology Examine the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Examine the structure of the cell and human body systems. 56 hours. Equivalent: BIOL10012 or BIOLMLA52.
HIST10010 History:Myth and Reality 42 hours.
INDS10030 First Nations, Metis, and Inuit Perspectives

Examine First Nations, Metis, and Inuit (FNMI) societies' pre and post contact. Critically analyse impacts of colonization on First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples. Explore cultural, political, social, and economic perspectives relevant to FNMI peoples. Critique generational impacts and examine the relevance of measures such as the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous people. 42 hours. Equivalent: INDS10022.

INDS10034 Indigenous Wholistic Practices Examine a wholistic view of land based health and wellness as practiced by Indigenous Peoples past, present, and future. Analyse the impact of colonization and associated ethical impacts. Define wholistic health and wellness for community, individuals, and society. 42 hours. Equivalent: INDS10033.
LITR10000 Speculative Fiction Explore science fiction, fantasy and horror to consider possible futures or alternative histories in worlds that can be vastly or slightly different from ours. Examine various sub-genres in speculative fiction to identify new ways of thinking about some of the issues we face today. 42 hours.
MATHMA006 Mathematics 1 - General Arts And Science

Practice basic mathematic and algebraic skills, including numeracy and problem solving, as preparation for college level math courses in the business and technology programs. Investigate various topics including: Integers, Exponents and Order of Operations, Solving First Degree Equations, Simplifying Polynomial Expressions, Factoring, Ratio and Proportions, Percents, and Unit Conversions. 42 hours. Equivalent: MATH10008.

OPELAS921 G.A.S. Option 1

This course represents your first requirement to complete a General Arts & Science Elective. General Arts & Science elective courses require that a student reliably demonstrates the Vocational Standards and Essential Employability Skills as defined for the General Arts & Science program by the Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities. 42 hours.

OPELAS922 G.A.S. Option 2

This course represents your second requirement to complete a General Arts & Science Elective. General Arts & Science elective courses require that a student reliably demonstrates the Vocational Standards and Essential Employability Skills as defined for the General Arts & Science program by the Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities. 42 hours.

PSOL10013 Introduction to Government in Society

Explain the structure and function of government within society with a focus on the Canadian context. Critically examine the complexities of the Canadian federal system in relationship to social, political, and economic change. Investigate the influence that geography, language, religion, and ethnicity have had and examine their implications to issues of regionalism and diversity. Explore the role of political parties and the electoral system and their influence on voting patterns and citizen engagement. 42 hours. Equivalent: SSCISS105.

PSOL10015 Critical Perspectives and Society Explore modern life and culture using a range of critical perspectives. Critique dominant cultural narratives to examine the impacts of familiar elements in our lives, such as technology, fashion, media, and food. 42 hours.
PSYC10028 Positive Psychology

Explore various pathways to well-being, as we learn evidence-based strategies with roots in the science of Positive Psychology. Discover ways in which you can improve your mindset, increase self-awareness and self-understanding, cultivate flourishing relationships, practice self-care, and align your life with your values and purpose. By practicing a variety of these interventions, we can learn to flourish in our personal, interpersonal and professional lives, as we create a life worth living. 42 hours.

PSYC10032 Criminal Psychology

Explore the psychology of violent offenders including serial killers, mass murderers, and mobsters. Identify biopsychosocial risk factors to explain why some people are predisposed to predatory violence. Analyze research on the psychopathic brain to determine whether psychopaths are born or made. Examine societal responses to violent criminality in terms of victimology and criminal punishment. 42 hours. Equivalent: PSYC10031.

PSYCSS156 Introduction to Psychology

Explore the scientific study of mental processes and behaviour, including the concepts of normality and abnormality. Investigate the biological basis of human experience, sensation and perception, learning and memory, and the nature of consciousness. Examine personality theories, health and stress, and various psychological disorders, including their etiology and treatments. 42 hours. Equivalent: PSYCSS126 or PSYCSS157 or PSYC10005.

SSCI10058 Aging in Society

Explain the demographic shifts that have led to an aging population and explore the social, cultural and gendered aspects of aging in society with a focus on the Canadian context. Critically examine the implications of a "greying" nation from personal, interdisciplinary, national and global perspectives. 42 hours.

SSCI10076 Drugs, Behaviour, & Society Examine common substances of abuse, their physical and psychological effects on users, and their place in Canadian society. Analyze the current approach to the regulation of substances of abuse and drug policy. Explore the nature of substance dependence and models of treatment and harm-reduction. 42 hours.
SSCI10078 Human Nature: Democracy, Sustainability, and the Fate of Civilization Explore the nature of human beings from an interdisciplinary perspective. Are we destined to destroy ourselves and the ecosystems we depend on? Can we envision a democratic, peaceful, and sustainable future for human civilization?
SSCIAS106 Popular Culture

Assess popular culture (TV, ads, music, clothing, etc.) and its impact on society using selected cultural and sociological theories. Evaluate the content of popular culture, the cultural representations (of gender, race, sexual orientation, etc.) portrayed, and their effects upon society. Critically examine the media, media concentration, and media bias within democratic societies. Outline the history and development of modern consumer culture and analyse the social impacts of consumer culture, both at the local and global levels. Identify forms of cultural resistance and analyse and evaluate effective strategies of cultural resistance. 42 hours.

SSCISS108 Introduction to Sociology

Examine the nature of sociology, as well as its historical roots and theoretical frameworks. Explore how society influences human behaviour by studying the problems and social issues in society and gaining an appreciation of how society affects people in every sphere of life including, the individual, family, culture, education, politics and the economy. Distinguish between crime and deviance and the changing nature of crime in society. Equivalent: SSCI10047.

SSCISS299 Society, Technology And Social Issues

Examine significant technological developments from an historical perspective and consider their immediate social, political, economic and ecological impact. Explore associated ethical dilemmas and implications for the future. 42 hours. 42 hours.

Option Group 3 – Choose 4

ANTR10002 Issues in Health and Healing

Analyze the concepts and issues within medical anthropology and sociology relevant to healing practices of indigenous and industrialized peoples. Examine the relationships between faith, culture, society, healing and sickness. Consider how current definitions of health are constructed and how they shape perceptions about health and well-being, illness, and disease and the connections between healing systems, health, social structure, and social class. Examine the development of medicare systems, the medicalization of society, and current issues within Canadian health care. 42 hours. Equivalent: HLTHAS108.

ANTR10003 Introduction to Forensic Anthropology

Analyze human and non-human remains to reconstruct identity and context. Explore the basic principles, concepts, and techniques behind paleoanthropology, bioarchaeology, and forensic anthropology. Identify and use the human skeletal system to determine sex, ancestry, trauma, and disease. Use basic research principles and technologies (as they pertain to cultural and biological artefacts) within anthropology to reconstruct the past. 42 hours. Equivalent: SSCI10052.

CHEMPE106 Preparatory Chemistry

An introductory level course presenting selected topics in chemistry. 56 hours.

COMM10366 Crime Fiction

This course examines the cultural meaning of crime fiction looking at themes such as motivation, obsession, shame, and freedom in crime fiction. Students will examine early examples of the private detective story and critically consider the development of the genre's complexity in contemporary popular work. The course includes study of short story, novel, television, podcast and film. 42 hours.

HIST10020 History of War and Society: 20th Century Examine the causes, events, and consequences of the three major conflicts of the 20th century: World War I (1914-1918), World War II (1939-1945), and the Cold War (1945-1991). Examine the relationship of war to various aspects of society; these include ideologies, political systems, political and cultural movements, economic revolutions, politico-economic structures, and technological advancements. Identify some of the great political and military thinkers and leaders of the period. 42 hours.
HIST10023 Art History Explore how art reflects the human experience and has served social and political purposes throughout history. Identify specific features and unique design elements of representative works of art to determine their historical era and/or cultural context. Apply the basic elements of art and the components of the art reflection process to various works toward the development of your own personal perspective towards art. 42 hours. Equivalent: ARTT10052 or ARTTAS202.
INDS10031 Impacts of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Examine historical context and content contributing to development and implementation of residential schools in Canada. Holistically explore the impact of law, colonization and the resulting cultural genocide in Canada. Analyze the findings of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and resulting 94 Calls to Action. 42 hours.
INDS10032 Indigenous Peoples Evolving Media & Artistic Images Examine a wide variety of media and artistic sources that have influenced Canadian and Indigenous societies. Analyze the power dynamics influencing Canadian society, past, present, and future, and critique the respective generational impact on Indigenous Peoples. 42 hours.
INDS10035 Indigenous Connections to the Land Critically evaluate the impact of law, colonization, and treaties for Indigenous and Canadian citizens. Examine a variety of treaties that have influenced society and their resulting conflict of interests as demonstrated within current law. 42 hours.
INDS10036 First Nations Languages - Resilience and reclamations Explore First Nations languages, traditional to Turtle Island, reflecting on origins, teachings, and storytelling. Wholistically examine the colonial impacts and the resilience, resurgence and reclamation of First Nations languages. 42 hours.
LITR10001 Movies, Identity, & Culture Examine the impact of popular movies on society. Analyze how the use of language in movies affects perceptions of self-identity and social issues​, and propose change in real world situations. 42 hours.
MATHMA018 Math

Understand Unit Conversions, Geometry and Mensuration, Trigonometry, Graphing and Systems of Equations and Right Triangle Trigonometry. Prerequisite: MATHMA006. 42 hours. 

OPELAS923 G.A.S. Option 3 This course represents your third requirement to complete a General Arts & Science Elective. General Arts & Science elective courses require that a student reliably demonstrates the Vocational Standards and Essential Employability Skills as defined for the General Arts & Science program by the Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities. 42 hours.
OPELAS924 G.A.S. Option 4

This course represents your fourth requirement to complete a General Arts & Science Elective. General Arts & Science elective courses require that a student reliably demonstrates the Vocational Standards and Essential Employability Skills as defined for the General Arts & Science program by the Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities. 42 hours.

OPELAS925 G.A.S. Option 5 This course represents your fifth requirement to complete a General Arts & Science Elective. General Arts & Science elective courses require that a student reliably demonstrates the Vocational Standards and Essential Employability Skills as defined for the General Arts & Science program by the Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities. 42 hours.
OPELAS926 G.A.S. Option 6 This course represents your sixth requirement to complete a General Arts & Science Elective. General Arts & Science elective courses require that a student reliably demonstrates the Vocational Standards and Essential Employability Skills as defined for the General Arts & Science program by the Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities. 42 hours.
PHYSPE108 Preparatory Physics This is an introductory level course presenting select topics in physics, including unit conversions, kinematics in one direction, forces and Newton’s laws, work and energy, light and geometric optics, temperature and heat, fluid properties, and basic electricity. 56 hours.
PSOL10011 Introduction to Globalization

Explain foundational concepts related to globalization (colonialism, neo-colonialism, neoliberalism, deregulation, WTO, IMF, free trade, fair trade, etc.) Examine the complexity of globalization and conceptualize the role of the state, corporations, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and intergovernmental organizations such as the European Union, the WTO, the IMF and the World Bank. Explore different themes relevant to globalization and identify significant issues (USA influence in the economic development of Latin America, racism in Europe, labour conditions in Asia, etc.) at a local/global level. Analyse global issues from a Global North/Global South perspective. 42 hours. Equivalent: SSCI10048 or SSCI10016.

PSYC10015 Human Sexuality Develop and promote greater personal awareness and social understanding within the area of human sexuality. Analyse the behavioural and cultural aspects of human sexuality, and its biological aspects (including sexual anatomy and physiology, and sexual arousal and response). Gain a greater understanding of one's own sexuality, and a sensitivity and acceptance of others' sexual attitudes and behaviors. Explore the history of sexuality, sexual arousal and response, gender identity and roles, attraction, love, relationships, intimacy, contraception, abortion, lifespan issues around sexuality, STIs, atypical sexual variations, sexual coercion and commercial sex. 42 hours.
PSYCSS271 Developmental Psychology Describe the human growth process from conception to death in terms of social, emotional, physical, and intellectual functioning and examine the various theories of human development. Explain the nature-nurture debate, identify behaviour patterns that are abnormal for a particular developmental stage, and apply theoretical perspectives to explain "normal" and "abnormal" behaviour patterns throughout the human lifespan. Identify and describe positive environmental factors that can promote growth throughout the lifespan. 42 hours. Equivalent: PSYCSS144 or PSYCSS283 or PSYC10004 or EDUCEC121.
SSCI10037 Environmental Sustainability Deconstruct theoretical approaches to environmental sustainability and outline ecological concerns for the planet.  Identify and examine the complexity of the environmental problems (population growth, fossil fuel use, water resources, overconsumption, climate change, etc.) that our society faces, both nationally and globally.  Describe and critically evaluate sustainable choices (renewable energy, local food sources, telecommuting, policy initiatives, etc.) to address ecological concerns.  Analyse how one's consumption habits effects communities globally and determine one's ecological footprint. 42 hours.
SSCI10077 Cultural Norms @ Work Compare  Canadian social, academic and workplace behaviours to those around the globe. Identify how different cultural beliefs and values can help develop awareness of appropriate verbal and non-verbal norms  utilized in different cultures. Apply intercultural communication strategies to be more successful in global business interactions and multi-cultural environments. 42 hours.
SSCI10079 Digital Thinking & Innovative Design Examine the current digital revolution using a Higher Order Thinking (H.O.T.) process to support inclusive team-based decision making. Collaborate using project -based learning strategies and multimedia tools to design solutions to emerging digital concerns.  Discuss the social, cultural, and economic impact of digital technology with an emphasis on ethics and responsible digital citizenship.  Explore digital tools and their potential applications, both personal and professional. 42 hours.
SSCI10080 Self and Society Apply a sociological lens to examine links between human behaviour and the social environment. Explore the diverse perspectives that may be used to explain the connection between behaviour and the social world. Discuss concepts related to social structure, social interaction, inequality or race, ethnicity, and gender, the family, population, and social movements and social change. 42 hours. Equivalent: SSCISS109.
SSCIAS105 Race and Ethnic Dynamics Discuss ethnicity, racism, and multiculturalism and use sociological perspectives to analyze how they impact Canadian society. Explain intergroup dynamics, within a Canadian context, and analyze how this impacts on social inequality. Recall historical and contemporary immigration policies, identify the problems and challenges of Canadian immigration and emigration, and investigate the consequences of these policies have on the issues of diversity in society. 42 hours.
Getting Started

Visit CE Get Started, your go-to online resource for getting started. You’ll find information on online tools and the wide range of student services available to you to support your success as a Mohawk College student and to help you achieve your future goals!

Login to MyMohawk
MyMohawk is the college portal used to access your student account information, email, grades and more. Your username and password can be found on the Continuing Education Acknowledgement of Registration & Student Account form that was sent to you after you registered for your course. Visit the Getting Started - MyMohawk Guide for step-by-step instructions.

Access Mohawk Email
On the MyMohawk Home screen you will see a link to Mohawk email. Visit the Getting Started – Mohawk Email Guide to learn how to set up your account on your devices.

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Access OntarioLearn
Visit www.ontariolearn.com to access your course. Visit the OntarioLearn Course page for step-by-step instructions. Please note your course will not appear in OntarioLearn until the scheduled start date.

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Room assignments for Continuing Education are available on the WhereEnCampus Portal. Visit Room Listings for more information.

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Use the Mohawk College Textbook Search to find your course materials.

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Online learning courses provide you with the opportunity to learn online, anywhere, at your convenience!  You can study at home or at work - wherever you like, whenever you like, within a predetermined time frame.

Courses are delivered over a set time period and are led by instructors. Most courses do not require that you be online at a certain time of day or night, but that you are active in the course during the schedule. There are scheduled start and end dates and you cannot start courses late nor finish early.

Visit the MyCanvas Course page for registration information and a step-by-step guide to get started. Please note your course will not appear in MyCanvas until the scheduled start date.

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