Libraries and Digital Technologies Certificate - 965

Ontario College Graduate Certificate
Online
Students Studying
Overview

Digital technologies are transforming libraries and their services, making digital competencies key to success in today’s evolving library environment!

Designed for graduates of the Library and Information Technician Diploma or those with an existing library sciences education, this program explores the challenges, opportunities, and potential impact of current and emerging technologies on various library systems.

Gain the conceptual insight and practical leadership strategies needed to succeed through active learning, a culminating activity and capstone project. Available in an accessible, part-time, online program format, you can learn in an engaging environment without interrupting your current employment.

To review admission requirements for this program, and to apply, please view the Admissions & Registrations tab.

Pre-requisite:
  • Graduates of Library and Information Technician Diploma programs
  • Information professionals looking to complement their existing formal library science education at the college or university level
In this graduate program, you will:
  • Further your knowledge and skills related to technological change and the way that digital technologies are transforming libraries and their services
  • Obtain the skills and digital competencies needed to explore the opportunities and potential impact of current and emerging technologies within library and information organizations
  • Develop the 21st-century fluency skills essential for active participation in libraries of all types

This certificate meets the need for ongoing professional development in the area of libraries and digital technologies and provides a pathway for college and university graduates to broaden their learning.

 
Program Contact
Continuing Education Library
  • Library and Information Technician Diploma OR
  • Master's degree in library science, library and information science, information science or information OR
  • Graduate of Southern Ontario Library Service (SOLS) Excel, Advanced Excel or APLL program OR
  • Studied library science at an equivalent level outside of Canada OR
  • Bachelor's degree and substantial library experience at a significant level of responsibility

It is possible to take individual courses from the Libraries and Digital Technologies certificate as professional development. Please apply and note this on the form.

Academic Opportunities

Pathways and Credit Transfer

View our pathways map PDF. This Pathways map shows how the identified program can lead to future program choices.

The program of studies displayed below applies to students starting the program in the 2018/19 academic year. Students who began in other academic years may require different courses to be eligible to graduate. If you have questions regarding a strategy for completion contact Continuing Education - Community and Urban Studies.

Click on the Course number or Course title for more information on each course. 

Visit the Mohawk College Bookstore Textbook Search (opens in new window) for information on textbooks.

A selection of courses are available each term. Courses that are currently not available (N/A) for registration may be offered in the future – check back frequently.

Mandatory Courses

Register Course number Course title Course Hours
Course description: Focus on various types of information technology used in the library setting including mobile devices, e-readers, playaways, iPads and tablets, digital media and various software and applications. Access to a current mobile device with wireless Internet capability is required.
Equivalents: INFOLT390
Course description: Focus on electronic publishing, including using basic web design, image editing, screen recording, blogs, wikis, social networking, augmented reality, 3D printing and gamification.
Prerequisites: INFO10053 or INFO10113 or INFO10156 or COMP10136
Course description: Learn to apply metadata schemes and standards to describe digital and electronic web resources. Knowledge of HTML coding recommended.
Prerequisites: INFOLT402 and LIBRLT351 and LIBR10043 or INFOLT402 and LIBRLT351 and LIBRLT305
Course description: Develop skills in planning and delivering instruction in various library environments. Focus on effective presentation techniques, educational technologies, information literacy, learning styles, and instructional design and evaluation methods.
Course description: Learn to apply Boolean constructs and other concepts for efficient retrieval of information from the Internet, library catalogues and commercial databases.
Equivalents: LIBRLT220
Course description: Focus on RDA guidelines for descriptive catalogue records and MARC coding and ISBD punctuation for bibliographic records in an automated environment.
Prerequisites: LIBRLT110
Equivalents: LIBRLT302
Course description: User experience (UX) research explores the behaviour, needs, and expectations of the users of a product or service in order to create a better product or service. Apply the principles and methods of user experience research to a library environment. Practice research methods and develop a research plan leading to insights about library users and improvements to physical and virtual library services and spaces.
Course description: Explore strategies for leadership within current and evolving library environments including strategies focused on self-management and collaboration. Examine decision-making competencies and key factors supporting successful management and implementation of change. Assess leadership outcomes through analysis of impacts on the organization or community. Apply critical thinking skills and accurate, persuasive communication to library leadership in a multimedia world.
Course description: Explore the management of library resources in electronic formats with emphasis on collection development, licensing and acquisition of e-resources, as well as issues relating to access, copyright and archiving. Examine the integration of social media platforms in provision of services. Assess the role of electronic resource management systems (ERMs) and digital repositories.
Course description: Examine the expanding educational role and function of libraries as they become digital spaces supporting community creativity, engagement and participatory learning. Investigate how reframing of the library within the new culture of innovation, creativity and imagination supports users as they create, build and craft with digital technology and tools.
Course description: Develop the practice of lifelong learning through reflective inquiry and a range of professional development skills evaluating learning processes and progress. Create an e-portfolio demonstrating a deepened awareness of student learning throughout the program while archiving the integration and application of learning to the student’s work environment. Conduct a digital technology needs assessment within an organization that leads to a project proposal and presentation in Capstone II.
Credits: 7
Prerequisites: INFOLT402 and LIBR10035 and LIBR10042 and LIBR10041 and LIBR10036 and INFO10172 and LIBR10046 and LIBR10047 and LIBR10048 and LIBR10049
Course description: Broaden your educational experience to include the varied services of different types of libraries. Supervised experience in libraries is essential in the development of library skills. Before registering, and to obtain important information, visit ce.mohawkcollege.ca/library and submit a placement planning form.
Prerequisites: LIBR10050

Dolores Harms Penner

My name is Dolores Harms Penner, and I am the Program Specialist for the Library and Information Technician Diploma, the Libraries and Digital Technologies Certificate, and the Records and Information Management Certificate at Mohawk College. I also teach in the library technician program. I have been employed at Mohawk College since 2000.

I am a librarian, with a Master of Library Science degree from the University of Toronto, as well as a Bachelor’s degree in Mathematics from the University of Waterloo. In my career I have worked as Manager of the Information Centre at the Industrial Accident Prevention Association in Toronto, as Electronic Resources Librarian at Milton Public Library, and I have taught in the library technician programs at Seneca and Sheridan colleges.

I have really enjoyed becoming involved in library education and helping to prepare students for careers in the information field. It is a privilege to broaden students' knowledge through my work and in turn, I learn from them.