Library and Information Technician Diploma - 800

Ontario College Diploma
Online
Student in College library
Overview

Interested in learning more about this program?

If you are interested in attending a short online information session for this program, register by clicking on the button below.  We will contact you by email as details become available. The next session will take place in March/April 2019.

Register for the next information session!


Libraries are constantly evolving in their delivery and management of information. Library and Information Technicians have the knowledge and practical skills needed to perform in today’s evolving library environment. Combining theory and hands-on practice, students will learn to acquire, organize, produce, retrieve and disseminate information in print and electronic formats. Led by experienced librarians, this program will help prepare you for employment in academic, public, school and special libraries and other information service settings.

Offered in a flexible, part-time or full-time, online format, this program enables you to learn without interrupting your current employment.

This diploma program is equivalent to the two-year, full-time Library and Information Technician program.

“Mohawk’s online program enables people like myself who work full-time, and have a family, to study and achieve their goals at their own pace and on their own schedule.”

- Cindy Wilson

Library and Information Technician Diploma

Flexible, customizable learning:

Offered online, this program is a recognized preeminent online library education program in Canada.

Students select four elective courses, enabling them to customize their education to focus on specific topics of interest within the library/information field, including records management, archives, government information, school libraries and multimedia.

NOTE: Some courses have final exams that must be written in person. These are to be written in a college or university testing environment in the student’s local area.

OSAP:

This program is OSAP eligible.For more information, visit financial assistance at Mohawk.

Admission requirements:

Intended for those who have current or previous work or volunteer experience in a library/information setting. Taught online and taken on a part-time or full-time basis, participants have the opportunity to complete their diploma without having to interrupt their employment.

Placements:

Near the end of their time in the program, students complete two field placements, each of which are three weeks (105 hours) in length. Field placements may be completed on a part-time basis.

Program Contact
Continuing Education Library

Admission Requirements:

  • Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) OR equivalent (Mohawk Academic Upgrading, GED) OR Mature Student Status (19 years of age or older)
  • A pass in Grade 12 English, C or U or equivalent
  • Library or Information Services experience is strongly recommended

How to Apply:

Application must be submitted, with your official transcript, through the Ontario College Application Service (OCAS) www.ontariocolleges.ca.

Intake Full-Time Part-time
January 2019 Open Open
May 2019 Open Open
September 2019 Open Open
January 2020 Open Open
May 2020 Open Open

Full- and part-time career opportunities exist in:

  • public libraries and regional library services
  • libraries and resource centres serving colleges, universities, elementary and secondary schools and school boards
  • special libraries, such as those found in law offices, hospitals, corporations and government departments and agencies
  • bibliographic utilities, online and library system vendors and electronic publishers
  • the information services industry
  • cultural and non-profit organizations

 Graduates of this program will receive:

The program of studies displayed below applies to students starting the program in the 2018/19 academic year.  Students who began in other academic years may require different courses to be eligible to graduate.  If you have questions regarding a strategy for completion contact Continuing Education - Community and Urban Studies.

Click on the Course number or Course title for more information on each course. 

Visit the Mohawk College Bookstore Textbook Search (opens in new window) for information on textbooks.

A selection of courses are available each term. Courses that are currently not available (N/A) for registration may be offered in the future – check back frequently.

Mandatory Courses

Register Course number Course title Course Hours
Course description: This course will familiarize students with both the hardware and software of their computer system. Graduates will be able to use the most common functions of the WINDOWS operating system includng the WINDOWS Explorer program for file management and will be able to identify security risks and protect their computers from malware. Graduates will be able to build properly formatted documents using Microsoft Word and spreadsheets including correctly functioning formulas using Microsoft Excel. Microsoft Works is NOT acceptable for use in this course.
Credits: 3
Equivalents: INFO10156 or INFO10113 or INFO10095 or COMP10166 or COMP10191 or INFO10053
Course description: Apply the basic principles of effective supervision to a library environment. Topics include planning, recruitment, selection, training, motivation, delegation and time management.
Course description: Focus on various types of information technology used in the library setting including mobile devices, e-readers, playaways, iPads and tablets, digital media and various software and applications. Access to a current mobile device with wireless Internet capability is required.
Equivalents: INFOLT390
Course description: Analyze the role of libraries in an information society, with emphasis on access to information, the organization and services of different types of libraries, and the roles of participants in the information industry.
Course description: Explore circulation functions and issues for libraries and information services. Topics include inventory control, inter-library loan and document delivery. Copyright and health and safety issues in libraries are also discussed.
Equivalents: LIBRLT215
Course description: Examine the role of relational databases in library and information work. Learn to create a database, enter and edit records, search for information and create simple reports. MS Access 2016 required.
Credits: 1
Prerequisites: INFO10053 or INFO10113 or INFO10156 or COMP10136
Course description: Focus on electronic publishing, including using basic web design, image editing, screen recording, blogs, wikis, social networking, augmented reality, 3D printing and gamification.
Prerequisites: INFO10053 or INFO10113 or INFO10156 or COMP10136
Course description: Learn to apply Boolean constructs and other concepts for efficient retrieval of information from the Internet, library catalogues and commercial databases.
Equivalents: LIBRLT220
Course description: Focus on RDA guidelines for descriptive catalogue records and MARC coding and ISBD punctuation for bibliographic records in an automated environment.
Prerequisites: LIBRLT110
Equivalents: LIBRLT302
Course description: Discuss financial management concepts relating to libraries, with a focus on budgets, financial statements, library funding and strategic planning. Learn to use basic financial information to set goals and objectives. MS Excel software required.
Prerequisites: LIBRLT110 and INFO10113 or LIBRLT110 and INFO10053 or LIBRLT110 and INFO10156 or LIBRLT110 and COMP10136
Course description: Study the principles of classification. Learn to use the Dewey Decimal and Library of Congress Classification schemes. Explore issues related to the process of classifying library materials.
Prerequisites: LIBR10042 or LIBRLT302
Equivalents: LIBRLT320
Course description: Examine vital customer service skills including program planning and delivery, marketing, partnerships, user training and library advocacy.
Equivalents: LIBRLT435
Course description: Examine form and choice of entry according to RDA cataloguing guidelines, cataloguing applications of the web, and sources of cataloguing copy in an automated environment. Learn to critically appraise public access catalogues. Recognize changes in MARC coding resulting from RDA cataloguing guidelines.
Prerequisites: LIBR10042 or LIBRLT302
Equivalents: LIBRLT305
Course description: Explore fundamental principles of professional accountability that underpin the provision of information services in libraries. Develop effective reference interviewing techniques to answer customer queries. Explore topics related to the management of information service including service standards, in person and virtual service points, policy development and strategies for continuing professional development of staff.
Prerequisites: LIBR10041 or LIBRLT220
Equivalents: LIBRLT420
Course description:
Prerequisites: LIBRLT110
Course description: Explore the technical service aspects of serials with emphasis on ordering, tracking and cataloguing. Evaluate the impact of technology on serial collections.
Prerequisites: LIBR10042 or LIBRLT302
Course description: Broaden your educational experience to include the varied services of different types of libraries. Supervised experience in libraries is essential in the development of library skills. Before registering, and to obtain important information, visit ce.mohawkcollege.ca/library and submit a placement planning form.
Prerequisites: INFO10172 and LIBR10041 and LIBR10042 and LIBR10037 or INFOLT390 and LIBRLT220 and LIBRLT302 and LIBRLT215
Course description: This course represents your first requirement to complete a General Education elective. General education courses are intended to broaden your educational experience, and help you to develop new perspectives on your life and career. These courses must focus on content that is separate from your core area of study, and must reflect at least one of the five themes of general education as defined by the Ministry of Training Colleges and Universities: Arts in Society, Civic Life, Social and Cultural Understanding, Personal Understanding, Understanding Science and Technology.
Credits: 3
Course description: Study the principles of indexing including indexing types and rules, and creation of abstracts. Explore the principles of subject analysis including thesauri and Library of Congress Subject Headings.
Prerequisites: LIBR10043 or LIBRLT305
Equivalents: LIBRLT325
Course description: Focus on reference services and resources used to answer information queries from library customers. Compare and evaluate traditional and emerging reference resources. Apply online search skills to effectively answer typical queries.
Prerequisites: LIBR10044 or LIBRLT420
Equivalents: LIBRLT425
Course description: This course represents your second requirement to complete a General Education elective. General education courses are intended to broaden your educational experience, and help you to develop new perspectives on your life and career. These courses must focus on content that is separate from your core area of study, and must reflect at least one of the five themes of general education as defined by the Ministry of Training Colleges and Universities: Arts in Society, Civic Life, Social and Cultural Understanding, Personal Understanding, Understanding Science and Technology.
Credits: 3
Course description: Broaden your educational experience to include the varied services of various types of libraries in a different type of library than your first placement. Supervised experience in libraries is essential in the development of library skills. Before registering, and to obtain important information, visit ce.mohawkcollege.ca/library and submit a placement planning form.
Prerequisites: WORKLT290 and INFOLT402 and LIBR10040 and INFOLT340 and LIBRLT350 and LIBRLT351 and HRESLT150 and LIBR10039 and LIBR10043 and LIBR10044 or WORKLT290 and INFOLT402 and LIBRLT435 and INFOLT340 and LIBRLT350 and LIBRLT351 and HRESLT150 and LIBRLT320 and LIBRLT305 and LIBRLT420

Select 1 from the next 3 courses

Register Course number Course title Course Hours
Course description: Hone essential business communication skills with emphasis on writing clear reports and documentation, making effective presentations, and enhancing interpersonal skills.
Credits: 3
Course description: Build skills and confidence in communicating respectfully with people from different cultures. Consider differences in gestures, personal space and customs and identify intercultural issues in North American society.
Credits: 3
Course description: Communication is an introductory college level English course. Students exiting this course will demonstrate competence in grammar, sentence structure, and writing skills. Successful students in this course will develop the reading, writing, critical and analytical skills essential to them as communicators in college and upon graduation. This course teaches writing through the critical reading of various fiction and non-fiction material and brings students to college level foundation skills.
Equivalents: COMM10045 or COMM10050 or COMMLL008 or TEMPLL041 or COMMLL223 or COMM10100 or COMMLL044 or COMMLL126 or COMM10187 or COMM10332 or COMM10256 or COMM10351

Select 1 from the next 6 courses

Register Course number Course title Course Hours
Course description: This 42 hour on-line Science Fiction course shows you other worlds. It describes possible future societies and the problems lurking ahead. It also shows how human beings can and do create these future worlds - that our future is in our hands. Science fiction stands as a bridge between science and art, between the engineers of technology and the poets of humanity. Text extra. Final exam.
Credits: 3
Course description: Learn to appreciate literature critically be reviewing literary history and examining different genres. You will explore these themes and conventions associated with these genres and develop an understanding of literary analysis and various critical approaches.
Credits: 3
Course description: Focus on literary analysis (written and oral) of selected Canadian novels and short stories, with emphasis on target audience, the relevance of setting and plot in relation to Canadian culture and history, and literary devices.
Credits: 3
Course description: Examine the history and development of children's literature and its varied forms and techniques. Explore major authors and important issues presented in this genre. Note: May involve material that is explicit and/or offensive to some.
Credits: 3
Course description: Explore the magical worlds of Harry Potter and other amazing characters in children's fantasy literature. Discover their creators and the underlying mythologies upon which they draw. Learn to assist children and adults in appreciating the genre.
Credits: 3
Course description: For exemption purposes only.
Credits: 3

Select 2 from the next 6 courses

Register Course number Course title Course Hours
Course description: Explore readers’ advisory services and the components of readers’ advisory work from patron interview to service promotion. Examine the principal genres of fiction and determine their specific characteristics and appeal for readers.
Course description: Explore the role of public library staff in youth advocacy and community partnerships serving teens. Investigate the basics of collection development, programming, space design and readers’ advisory services for this age group.
Course description: Develop skills in planning and delivering instruction in various library environments. Focus on effective presentation techniques, educational technologies, information literacy, learning styles, and instructional design and evaluation methods.
Course description: Explore the unique features of elementary and secondary school libraries. Examine collection development and management, readers’ advisory and reference services, and library programming in a school library setting. Consider new and emerging initiatives such as the Learning Commons model of school library services.
Course description: Examine the issues and responsibilities associated with children’s library services in a public library setting. Investigate the basics of planning and administration, collection development and management, information and readers’ advisory services, and programming and program promotion.
Course description: Address collection development, technical services, client services, marketing, budgeting and management for special libraries. Consider the concerns of the special library and skills needed in this environment.
Prerequisites: LIBRLT110

Select 2 from the next 11 courses

Register Course number Course title Course Hours
Course description: Library staff play a vital role in linking citizens with the government information they need. Consumer guides, statistics, technical reports, handbooks, and maps are types of government publications now issued free on the Web. Focuses on finding and using these sources as well as print format government documents. Not open to students with LIBRLT361 Government Publications.
Prerequisites: LIBRLT110
Course description: Explore health information resources in all formats and identify the features and issues of different types of health libraries. Develop skills in searching the major indexes, databases and the web to meet users’ information needs.
Prerequisites: LIBR10041 or LIBRLT220
Course description: Learn to apply metadata schemes and standards to describe digital and electronic web resources. Knowledge of HTML coding recommended.
Prerequisites: INFOLT402 and LIBRLT351 and LIBR10043 or INFOLT402 and LIBRLT351 and LIBRLT305
Course description: Focus on materials in formats such as video, DVD, films, compact discs, records, software, talking books, pictures and maps. Explore the acquisition, processing, cataloguing, storage and circulation of these materials. Discuss copyright and public performance, equipment needs and maintenance, as well as other trends.
Prerequisites: LIBR10043 or LIBRLT305
Course description: Explore the Canadian and Ontario legal systems, with emphasis on publications, research and the basics of running a law library. Learn to use primary and secondary legal materials in print and electronic format. Examine acquisitions, cataloguing and collection development in a law library setting. Access to a law library is required.
Course description: Develop an understanding of archival theory and practice. Focus on the relationship between archives and records management, acquisition and appraisal, arrangement and description, reference services, preventive conservation, and facility planning and security.
Course description: Explore the field of records management and the role of records management programs in organizations. Develop your skills in inventorying, retention and destruction scheduling, and records management, including electronic records.
Course description:
Course description:
Course description:
Course description:

Program Specialist

Dolores Harms Penner

My name is Dolores Harms Penner, and I am the Program Specialist for the Library and Information Technician Diploma, the Libraries and Digital Technologies Certificate, and the Records and Information Management Certificate at Mohawk College. I also teach in the library technician program. I have been employed at Mohawk College since 2000.

I am a librarian, with a Master of Library Science degree from the University of Toronto, as well as a Bachelor’s degree in Mathematics from the University of Waterloo. In my career I have worked as Manager of the Information Centre at the Industrial Accident Prevention Association in Toronto, as Electronic Resources Librarian at Milton Public Library, and I have taught in the library technician programs at Seneca and Sheridan colleges.

I have really enjoyed becoming involved in library education and helping to prepare students for careers in the information field. It is a privilege to broaden students' knowledge through my work and in turn, I learn from them.

Awards

All students graduating from this program at Mohawk College are automatically considered for the following three awards:

  1. Ontario Association of Library Technicians / Association des bibliotechniciens d'Ontario Award presented annually to the graduate with the highest standing in Library Technical courses.
  2. The Library Technician Award presented annually to the graduate with the highest average in all courses taken as part of the Library and Information Technician diploma.
  3. The Geraldine Hughes Award presented annually to the graduate with the highest standing in cataloguing and classification courses.

Award winners will be determined for awards in the order listed above. Once a student has been granted one award, s/he is not eligible for the other two awards.

Award winners will be notified by email each year. Awards will be mailed out - not presented at the Mohawk College Convocation ceremony.

Field Work for Library and Information Technician Students

Process

  1. Carefully read and consider all information provided here.
  2. If you have completed the prerequisite requirements for either Field Work I or Field Work II and you can complete a placement within the time parameters of a 14-week session, complete a placement planning form and submit it online.
  3. The instructor will respond regarding possible field placement sites.
  4. Based on your discussion with the instructor, you will contact one of the agreed-upon libraries and make tentative placement arrangements.
  5. Notify the instructor of your arrangements so that she can confirm with the library.
  6. When you have access to the online course area, log on to access and complete the Student Placement Agreement form and post it in the Dropbox.
  7. During the placement, read the information in the online course area, post a mid-placement report and undertake other tasks described in the online course area.
  8. At the end of the placement, post your evaluation form to the appropriate Dropbox, and confirm that your field placement supervisor has submitted theirs as well.
  9. Once both of these forms have been received, and the placement is seen as successful by both the student and the host library, the instructor will submit your mark (successful placement = "R" - Requirements Met or "P" -Pass).

Introduction

Two field placements are required as part of the library and information technician program at Mohawk College. Paid work cannot be used as a field placement. Click on the following links to access course outlines for Field Work I (opens PDF, 563.7kb) and Field Work II (opens PDF, 564.4kb)

Goals and Objectives

The goals of field work in Mohawk’s Library Technician program are to provide you with the opportunity to:

  1. have your work evaluated by a professional librarian, library technician or teacher-librarian
  2. broaden your exposure to different types of libraries (e.g. public, school, academic, special), and different types of library work (e.g. public services, technical services, administrative services), as per CLA Guidelines, quoted below
  3. practise acceptable workplace comportment, e.g. punctuality, reliability, proper attire, etc.
  4. develop the insight needed to wisely select future elective courses that are related to identified career interests
  5. develop an ability to advocate for libraries, and verbalize the role and importance of libraries in this technological age
  6. understand the importance of professional development and lifelong updating to maintain knowledge currency
  7. begin to assemble the building blocks of a career as a library and information technician

“A wide variety of field experiences in different types of libraries is desirable for each student ... Each field placement should constitute a new library learning experience. Ordinarily this necessitates avoiding a library in which a student has already worked, as well as the library of the educational institution where the program is located.”
- from “Guidelines for the Education of Library Technicians”, Canadian Library Association, 2011

Prerequisites

It is preferred that you undertake your field placements during the second half of your studies in the program. Following are the prerequisites for each of the placements:

Field Work Prerequisites:
Field Work I
WORKLT290
  • INFO 10172 (Information Technology for Library Technicians)
  • LIBR 10041 (Online Searching)
  • LIBR 10042 (Resource Description and Access I)
  • LIBR 10037 (Circulation and Inter-Library Loan)
Field Work II
WORKLT490
  • WORK LT290 (Field Work I)
  • INFO LT402 (Electronic Publishing and Emerging Library Technologies)
  • LIBR 10040 (Library Programming, Marketing and Advocacy)
  • INFO LT340 (Database Design for Information Workers)
  • LIBR LT350 (Acquisitions)
  • LIBR LT351 (Serials)
  • HRES LT150 (Human Relations and Supervision)
  • LIBR 10039 (Library Classification)
  • LIBR 10043 (Resource Description and Access II)
  • LIBR 10044 (Reference Processes)

For some field placement sites the student will be required to provide a police criminal record check. This should be requested from your local police department as early as possible, as it can take up to 8 weeks to receive it. 

Length and Schedule

Field placements are 112 hours. This is comprised of 105 hours of field placement (equivalent to 3 weeks work @ 35 hours per week) and 7 hours of related tasks.

Field placement hours may be worked on a full-time or part-time basis, as long as the schedule is acceptable to both you and the host library. Placement hours must be completed within one 14-week field placement session.

The field placement sessions for the academic year are scheduled as follows:

  • Fall session I: Session runs September – December
  • Fall session II: Session runs October - January
  • Fall session III: Session runs November - February
  • Fall session IV: Session runs December - March
  • Winter session I: Session runs January - April
  • Winter session II: Session runs February - May
  • Winter session III: Session runs March - June
  • Winter session IV: Session runs April - July
  • Spring session I: Session runs May - August
  • Spring session II: Session runs June - September
  • Spring session III: Session runs July - October
  • Spring session IV: Session runs August - November

Field Placement Sites and Supervisors

Field placements cannot be done in your current or previous place of employment or within the same library system. It is also best to do placements in a type of library/information services setting that is different from your previous experience. Consider public, academic (college or university), school, and special (corporations, hospitals, law offices, government departments, etc.) libraries.

The field placement supervisor at the library must be a qualified librarian, library technician or teacher-librarian, with the appropriate educational background.

 

Field Placement Supervisor Evaluation Forms:

Field Placement 1

Field Placement 2

Placement Planning Form

Arranging Field Work

Once you and the instructor jointly determine some appropriate libraries for your placement, you normally make the first contact with the library to see if they would be willing to host your field placement.

Once you have made tentative arrangements with the host library, email the instructor your field placement supervisor’s name, job title, library name, email address, and your planned start and end dates. The instructor will contact the field placement supervisor to confirm arrangements and explain the College's expectations.

Guidelines for Approaching Libraries for Field Placements

The following guidelines are for situations where students need to approach a staff person in the library in order to determine whether the library would be interested in hosting a field placement for the student.

You should check with your instructor for guidance regarding who in the library would be best to contact first – for example, the person at the reference desk, a department head or the chief librarian. Be prepared for the fact that this person may refer you to someone else within the organization.

Guidelines:

  • always remember that library staff are not obligated to agree to your request; their response may depend on the time that they have available and their circumstances, however their response may also depend on how they feel that you presented your request to them
  • contact the staff person well in advance, not at the last minute
  • use good telephone etiquette; for example, give your name and the reason for your call immediately, or if leaving a message, do so briefly and clearly
  • be courteous; for example, say thank you and promptly return phone calls and emails
  • be as flexible as possible in setting a time to meet to discuss your request or to arrange a tentative schedule

 

Remember that you are serving as an ambassador of our program. Your contact person may assume that all students in our program will conduct themselves in a manner similar to you. Please do your best to be a good representative of our program.

Forms for the Student and Host Library

You need to register for WORKLT290 (Field Work I) or WORKLT490 (Field Work II) with Mohawk or your registering college, for the appropriate session after you have notified your instructor of your arrangements. Once successfully completed, the field placement shows on your academic record, together with all other courses taken.

At the start of your field placement session, you will be given access to an Ontariolearn Desire2Learn online course area for field placement. Log on as soon as possible and follow the instructions there. 

Student Placement Agreement (must be signed by host library)

Acknowledgement Form

Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Waiver

Release Form

During the Field Placement

During the field placement, you will have access to an online course area for field placement. One of the items of information in the online course area will be a reminder asking you to post a brief report part-way through your placement to ensure that the placement is proceeding satisfactorily. The instructor will contact your field placement supervisor at your host library to check in as well. Other tasks will be assigned in the online course area.

Some recommendations for you during your field placements:

  • maintain a professional manner in all contacts with library clientele and staff
  • act as a responsible employee, e.g. be punctual, notify your host library if an absence is necessary
  • dress according to the acceptable standard within the host library

 

It is a nice touch to send a thank you note or email to your host library at the end of your placement.

At the End of the Field Placement

At the end of the placement, both you and the host library complete evaluation forms that are returned to the instructor. Your form is available in the online course area.

In the unlikely event that your field placement is determined by the host library supervisor and the instructor to be unsuccessful, you will only be permitted to repeat the placement once.

Prior Learning Assessment & Recognition (PLAR) for Field Work

WORKLT290 Field Work I may be challenged through the Prior Learning Assessment process at Mohawk College, by students with extensive library work experience. Contact Mohawk's PLAR office (plar [at] mohawkcollege.ca) and Student Inquiries (celibrary [at] mohawkcollege.ca) for more information.

Students who register at other colleges, please contact your registering college for information on Prior Learning Assessment & Recognition.

WSIB

As a student on placement you are covered through the college should you be injured on placement. Your coverage applies for the duration of your placement. Should an incident or injury occur you are responsible for contacting the Program Manager and your library supervisor to inform them as soon as possible. Based on the severity of the incident or injury documentation may be required, some of which has strict timelines.

Responsibilities of the Student

The student will be responsible for:

  • working with the instructor to arrange placement
  • contacting the field placement supervisor in advance of the placement to discuss the student's previous library employment and current career goals so that appropriate placement activities can be planned ahead of time
  • working within the hours normally required of library technicians in the placement library
  • notifying the supervisor when an absence is necessary
  • acting as a responsible employee in all contacts with library clientele and staff
  • providing both the placement supervisor and the placement coordinator with feedback concerning the placement
  • demonstrating sufficient knowledge of library techniques to be able to adapt to practices of particular libraries; students doing the second field placement are expected to demonstrate increased knowledge and professionalism

Responsibilities of the College

The instructor will be responsible for:

  • working with the student to arrange placement
  • requesting that an affiliation agreement be sent to the library or host organization
  • placing the student in a setting that will provide an adequate learning experience
  • contacting the student and supervisor during the placement to discuss the student's progress and aiding the supervisor in matters relating to supervision
  • being available to the supervisor and the student to discuss any problem that might arise
  • assigning final grade (pass/fail) for each field placement

Contact

Contact our student inquiries email for library technician students: celibrary [at] mohawkcollege.ca

Information for Host Libraries

Introduction

Two field placements are required as part of the library and information technician program at Mohawk College. Paid work cannot be used as a field placement. Click on the following links to access course outlines for Field Work I (opens PDF, 563.7kb) and Field Work II (opens PDF, 564.4kb)

Hosting placements is beneficial to the library as well as the student. It allows the library to: 

- identify possible future employees

- see their own library/department through a different lens

- consider new ideas or approaches to issues and tasks

- raise the profile of their library, and 

- support the profession by providing a strong foundation to someone entering this field of work.

Length and Schedule

Field placements are 112 hours. This is compromised of 105 hours of field placement (equivalent to 3 weeks work @ 35 hours per week) and 7 hours of related tasks.

Field placement hours may be worked on a full-time or part-time basis, as long as the schedule is acceptable to both the host library and the student. Placement hours must be started and completed within one 14-week field placement session.

Field Placement Supervision

Our requirements are that the overall supervision of a placement student must be done by someone with the educational qualifications of a librarian, library technician or teacher-librarian. This is amended for other types of information service settings.

Arranging a Field Placement

If you agree to host a field placement, the student will advise the Instructor, who will contact you to confirm and answer any questions that you may have, before the placement starts. An affiliation agreement will also be sent, if not already in place.

During the Placement

There aren’t specific requirements for field placement tasks because every library/information services setting is different. However as much as possible, placement students should be given the same type of work as is/would be done by a library technician who is employed in that setting. Hands-on work is encouraged. Also, as much as possible, students should be exposed to different types of tasks and functions within the library, rather than being assigned to one project for the duration of their placement hours. This provides a broader learning experience for our students.

However it is recognized that host libraries need to balance the demands that placement students make on staff time with resources available, and it is not expected that host libraries engage in large amounts of training for students.

Many students in our program have current or previous work experience in libraries or other information service settings, so they come with some practical experience as well as the knowledge that has been gained through courses. Thus they normally adapt to new library/information settings fairly quickly.

It is important, for student learning, that evaluation be ongoing rather than reserved for the end of the placement. Expectations should be clearly set out by the supervisor at the beginning of work assignments.

The instructor will contact the field work supervisor during the placement to see how the placement is progressing.

After the Placement

There is a brief evaluation form that the placement supervisor is asked to complete at the end of the placement, and share with the student, before submitting it online.

Field Work I Evaluation

Field Work II Evaluation

Forms for the Host College

Before hosting a field placement, you may be contacted by the student's registering college regarding an affiliation agreement, if one is not already in place.

WSIB

Students on placement are covered through the college should they be injured on placement. Their coverage applied for the duration of their placement. Should an incident or injury occur the student is responsible to contact Mohawk College and the library supervisor to inform them as soon as possible. Based on the severity of the incident or injury paperwork may be required, some of which has strict timelines.

Responsibilities of the Library/Host Organization

The library will be responsible for:

  • preparing staff members for the arrival of the student
  • providing orientation for the student
  • discussing with the student the purpose and goals of the library's collections and services
  • providing the student with supervision and ongoing feedback
  • providing the student with enough practical experience to give him/her an opportunity to practice and develop skills
  • evaluating the student's knowledge and performance and discussing the evaluation report with him/her before returning it to the instructor

 

Responsibilities of the College

The instructor will be responsible for:

  • working with the student to arrange placement
  • requesting that an affiliation agreement be sent to the library or host organization
  • placing the student in a setting that will provide an adequate learning experience
  • contacting the student and supervisor during the placement to discuss the student's progress and aiding the supervisor in matters relating to supervision
  • being available to the supervisor and the student to discuss any problem that might arise
  • assigning final grade (pass/fail) for each field placement

Contact

Contact CE Library at celibrary [at] mohawkcollege.ca