ALS Accommodation Guides

 

Assignment Extension Accommodation Guide

The assignment extension accommodation is used to accommodate the episodic nature of a student’s disability. Students with disabilities where symptoms are not consistent, may temporarily become unable to complete assignments by the assigned due dates, as the exacerbation of symptoms can occur unexpectedly.

Due to the episodic nature of symptoms, a reduced course load or support with time management may not eliminate the need for extensions. As such:

  • The assignment extension accommodation is included in the Confidential Academic Accommodation Plan (CAAP)
  • Student provided with this accommodation should not be penalized for requested extensions

 

The assignment extension accommodation is not meant to be used for extended absences or with every assignment in a course. Students who have been absent for an extended period of time, and therefore will be unable to meet course objectives, will require support to explore alternative options. In these situations, students should connect with their faculty and Accessible Learning Services.

Additional Support

Students and faculty can connect with Accessible Learning Services to discuss this accommodation.

Extension Accommodation Procedure

  1. The student provides Accessible Learning Services with documentation from a regulated health care professional supporting the need for assignment extensions.
  2. Accessible Learning Services develops the CAAP to include the assignment extension accommodation and reviews this procedure with the student.
  3. In the event of an exacerbation of symptoms, student will request an assignment extension from his/her professor.
  • Requests should be made by email in advance of the due date. The email should include a plan to complete the work and the anticipated submission date (within the week extension). While students are not required to inform faculty of the specific nature of their disability, they should advise their faculty that they are experiencing exacerbation of symptoms, when making their request.

 

Email example:

Hello (insert professors name),

My name is (insert name and student number). I am in your (insert course name).

I am a student receiving accommodations from Accessible Learning Services. My CAAP includes extension on assignments as an accommodation.

I am currently experiencing an exacerbation of symptoms related to my disability. These symptoms are interfering with my ability to submit (insert assignment title and due date) by the due date.

My plan is to complete and submit this assignment by (insert date and time), which is within one week time frame offered by this accommodation. If you would like to discuss this further, please let me know.

Thank-you,

(Insert name and student number)

  1. Faculty will accept the request for assignment extension in good faith and agree upon a revised due date.

Appropriate Use

Given the diversity of assignments it is difficult to quantify the extensions that may be requested. Typically, an extension of one week for an assignment is a reasonable level of accommodation. If further and/or multiple extensions are required, the student faculty should contact Accessible Learning Services.

It is expected that student will use this accommodation only when unable to complete assignments due to an exacerbation of symptoms.

Requests for extensions should be made in advance of an assignment due date. In extraordinary circumstances (e.g. hospitalization), when the student is unable to request an extension in advance, the request should be dealt with on a case by case basis.

Strategies for Students

Students are encouraged to consult with their regulated health care professional to develop strategies for managing episodic nature of their disability.

Students with the assignment extension accommodation may wish to apply the following academic strategies.

  • Review learning plans to determine what the workload and course demands are. (Learning plans can be found on eLearn. If specific due dates for assignments are not included, students should connect with their faculty.) Once due dates and assignment details are given, students should develop a plan to complete each assignment well in advance of the due date.
  • Seek clarification on assignment details as early as possible.
  • Well before the due date, break assignments in smaller sections and work on them often. (In the event an assignment extension is needed a portion of the assignment will already be completed.)
  • Submit completed assignments early, where possible.
  • As soon as the student is aware an assignment is going to be late, the student can offer to submit what has been completed so far. (This will demonstrate progress and the assignment extension may only be for the portions of the assignment that have not yet been completed.

 

If an assignment extension is still required, students should develop a plant to complete the assignment and include this plan when making a formal request to their professor.

Group Assignments/Projects and the Extensions on Assignments Accommodation:

  • Students with the Extensions on Assignments accommodation should discuss the potential need for any extension proactively with the course professor/instructor to determine how requesting an extension, if required, may impact a group assignment or project.
  • When a student requests an extension on a group assignment or project, professors can request that students submit the work they have completed up to the date of the extension request. This is to ensure that students remain on track with group assignments or projects and receive the feedback they may need to continue to complete the assignment.
  • Certain group assignments and projects may be arranged in a way that requires all group members to be present to perform a time-sensitive learning task that is difficult to replicate (e.g., studio and media courses, group performances). Thus, there may not be an opportunity for one group member to request an extension. When extensions for an entire group are not possible, professors/ instructors should consult with the student and the student’s Accessibility Counsellor to determine what options, if any, may be available.

 

Teaching Strategies

Faculty may wish to consider the use of the following teaching strategies to support students in meeting assignment due dates:

  • Offer assignment completion reminders, in class or on eLearn.
  • For larger assignments, suggest targets for progress. These targets can be included on the course learning plan, indicated in eLearn or on the assignment outline. (For example, if students have four weeks to complete an assignment suggest they have a rough outline done by week one, their research completed by week two, a draft completed by week three and by week four a final draft to check against the assignment rubric.
  • Offer Interim Due Dates that break assignments into smaller portions and request students submit. While grades do not need to be offered, feedback on each portion regarding how the student is progressing is very valuable. For more information on Interim Due Dates, visit the UDL website at: https://www.mohawkcollege.ca/employees/centre-for-teaching-learning/universal-design-for-learning/universal-design-for-0/interim
  • Anticipate that students who have this accommodation may require additional support. Offer opportunities for students to discuss assignments with a peer or faulty to support more effective time management.
  • Supply an exemplar of the assignment to demonstrate the breadth, depth and score of the work. This will help students to more accurately gauge the time they will need to complete the assignment.

 

Faculty Assistance

Faculty are encouraged to connect with Accessible Learning Services regarding the Assignment Extension accommodation and teaching strategies. Faculty can either contact the Accessibility Counsellor listed on the students Confidential Academic Accommodation Plan. Not sure who to contact? Email Accessible Learning Services at als [at] mohawkcollege.ca or phone 905-575-2211.

Audio Recording Accommodation Guide

Overview

Students who require audio recording of lectures have a disability that impacts the ability to efficiently process verbal information presented in class. As such, the student will benefit from revisiting verbal lecture information in order to effectively learn concepts.

Audio recording of lectures allows a student opportunity to concentrate on content presented in class, rather than the mechanics of writing.

Audio recordings give students the ability to review material they might have missed or not grasped when initially delivered. All learners can potentially benefit from audio recordings and instructors are encouraged to take the lead and create recordings as part of a Universal Design for Learning. Instructors can contact the Centre for Teaching and Learning for technological assistance.

Audio Recording Guidelines

The student must present the Accessibility Counsellor with documentation from a regulated health care professional (e.g. physician, psychologist and psychiatrist) that supports audio recording of lectures.

The Accessibility Counsellor updates the student’s accommodations to include this accommodation as well as reviews these guidelines with the student.

The student emails an initial or revised accommodation letter to the professor of the course where the audio recording accommodation will be used.

The professor reviews the Student Agreement found on the last page of this guide with the student.

Audio recording of lectures is allowable under existing Canadian copyright legislation, due to the exception of fair dealing. For those interested in accessing more information about copyright law as it relates to fair dealing and exceptions please refer to the Canadian Intellectual Property Office website at:

http://strategis.ic.gc.ca/sc_mrksv/cipo/cp/copy_gd_protect-_e.html#section06

At the discretion of the professor, audio recording may be prohibited during lectures that involve discussion on topics that may yield personal or confidential information and are likely to involve a degree of self-disclosure. If there are specific circumstances in which it is deemed inappropriate to record a particular class (or portion of class), all efforts will be made to inform the student well in advance. In circumstances where recording of lectures is not permitted, alternative arrangements to recording should be discussed between the professors and student.

Student Agreement

  1. Use the recorded files only for personal study and for NO other purposes.
  2. DO NOT, under any circumstances, distribute or share the recording with any other individual, in any format, without obtaining, the prior written consent of the professor.
  3. Respect the professor’s decision to prohibit recording of classes or portions of classes which may involve personal discussion and self-disclosure. In such a case, the student will work with their professor to discuss alternative arrangements. Students should focus their recording devices on course material being presented by the instructor and record or capture in a manner that ensures the privacy of other students present.
  4. Understand that the information contained in the recording is protected under federal and international copyright legislation.
  5. Do not publish or quote any lecture material without the professor’s explicit written consent and without properly identifying and crediting the professor.
  6. Failure to comply with this agreement may be considered a violation of any applicable Mohawk College policy including the Student Behaviour Policy.

Classroom Ergonomic Furniture Accommodation Guide

For some students registered with Accessible Learning Services, classroom ergonomic furniture is required which may include ergonomic seating, and adjustable height desks. The student’s CAAP will indicate the type of furniture required. 

Student Role: 

  • Provide Accessible Learning Services with a list of classroom locations
  • Locate the furniture within the classroom. Ergonomic chairs and adjustable desks are most often placed at the front of the classroom
  • Identify the furniture accommodation need to professor/instructor through submitting the CAAP. NOTE: Students are encouraged to introduce themselves to the professor/instructor at the start of each semester to review all accommodations
  • Notify Accessible Learning Services if furniture is delayed, removed, is missing, or is damaged during a semester

 

Accessible Learning Services Role:

  • Contact Mohawk College Facilities Department to request that the furniture be delivered to the required classrooms
  • Specify the type of furniture that is required, and the location required within the classroom
  • Connect with students to plan for ongoing use of the ergonomic furniture accommodation

 

Professor/Instructor Role: 

  • Review the student’s CAAP and note the ergonomic furniture accommodation
  • Assist with ensuring that the student with the accommodation need has access to the furniture. NOTE: Ergonomic furniture is often placed at the front of the class, with a reserved sign.
  • Notify Accessible Learning Services if furniture is delayed, removed, is missing, or is damaged during a semester

 

Need more information? 

Contact Accessible Learning Services Triage at 905-575-2211, email als [at] mohawkcollege.ca , or drop in to the Accessible Learning Services office at your cam

Computerized Note Taker Accommodation Guide

Computerized Note Takers

Mohawk College recognizes that Computerized Note Takers play an important role in the academic success of students who are Deaf, deafened, or hard of hearing. Mohawk College adheres to the guidelines put in place by the College Committee on Disability Issues (CCDI). For more information please see, http://www.disabilityissues.ca/

What should professors do?

  • At the beginning of each semester, allow the student who is Deaf, deafened, or hard of hearing the choice to introduce and explain the role of a Computerized Note Taker in the classroom.
  • Maintain the same expectations for students who are Deaf, deafened, or hard of hearing that you have for all students.
  • When addressing a student who is Deaf, deafened, or hard of hearing, speak directly to and facing him/her. The Computerized Note Taker will type what is being said.
  • Do not say anything in class that you do not want typed.
  • The Computerized note taking process involves typing verbatim. Monitor class interactions and discussions making sure that everyone speaks clearly and in turn.
  • Repeat questions originated by students in the class at large, rewording for clarity when necessary.
  • Computerized Note Takers, as part of the teaching team, will require all materials

(course learning plan, access to textbooks, notes, list of videos and their transcripts, etc.) in advance.

  • The Computerized Note Taker will position themselves close to the student and in close proximity to the professor.
  • Typing verbatim is a mentally and physically strenuous task. As a result, a Computerized Note Taker working alone will require a 10 minute break after every 50 minutes of typing.
  • In order to ensure continuous provision of services, please consult with Accessible Learning Services, prior to any proposed schedule changes.
  • If the student has not arrived within 20 minutes of the start of the regularly scheduled class, the Computerized Note Taker will leave.
  • Please ensure that you are familiar with the student’s Confidential Academic Accommodation Plan (CAAP).
  • Should you require computerized note taking services for any other student related situation (e.g., seminars, course trips), please contact Accessible Learning Services in advance.
  • If concerns arise regarding computerized note taking services, please speak with the Computerized Note Taker and consult Accessible Learning Services

Emailing Confidential Academic Accommodation Plan (CAAP) Guide

In order to access the accommodations noted on your CAAP, you will need to email your CAAP to each course professor.

Emailing your CAAP

STEP 1: Save a digital copy of your Accommodation Letter on your computer.

STEP 2: Locate your professors’ email.

  • Log into MyMohawk/Academic Profile/View my timetable.
  • Each course is a link. Click the link to find your professor’s name and email address.
  • You can find your course professor’s name and at MyMohawk/My courses/Access eLearn/click on the course.

 

STEP 3: Email your Accommodation Letter at the start of each term using the email template found below.

Important Information

Your Accommodation Letter is valid for two terms (semesters) and has an expiry date.

  • You can make revisions to your CAAP during the term by making an appointment with your Accessibility Counsellor.
  • Returning students do not need an appointment to renew an Accommodation Letter. If there are no changes email als [at] mohawkcollege.ca to have your Accommodation Letter updated.

 

Student Responsibilities

Students are responsible for updating and providing their CAAP to each professor. Students may request that ALS facilitate emailing their CAAP to professors.

Writing Your Email

Subject

Accessible Learning Services CAAP (name, student number, course name, course day and course time).

Body

Hi, my name is (fill in your first and last name) and I am (fill in your course name and time).

I am receiving accommodations and have attached my CAAP for you to review.

I would welcome the opportunity to discuss my accommodations with you. If you have any questions regarding my CAAP, please contact me Thank-you,

(Fill in your first and last name and student number)

Field and Clinical Placement Accommodation Guide

As a student with a disability, you may decide that accommodations for Work Integrated Learning (WIL) components of your program, such as field or clinical placements, are needed. If accommodations are needed for field or clinical placements, Accessible Learning Services can assist you with the completion of the Placement Support Form. The Placement Support form is a document that outlines your field or clinical placement accommodation needs, and provides you with guidance on how to discuss your accommodation needs with your field or clinical placement supervisor. If you require field or clinical placement accommodations, make an appointment with your Accessibility Counsellor to discuss completion of the Placement Support Form. If you are student who requires accommodations for field or clinical placement and you have not registered with Accessible Learning Services, please follow this link for registration information: https://www.mohawkcollege.ca/accessible-learning-services/accessible-learning-services-registration

Overview of Experiential Learning, WIL, and Field/Clinical Placement

Experiential Learning (EL) is an educational activity facilitated and supported by the College through which students learn while doing. Students participate in workplaces, or simulated workplaces, where they are exposed to authentic professional demands and expectations. Field, practicum, and clinical placements are two examples of WIL opportunities. The graphic below shows the relationship between EL and WIL.

fieldplacement.png

More information on EL and WIL can be found at:

https://www.mohawkcollege.ca/employees/centre-for-teaching-learning/experiential-learning

About the Placement Support Form

The Placement Support Form is available for students with a documented disability who are receiving support and accommodations through Accessible Learning Services at Mohawk College, and who are completing a WIL component of their program. The Placement Support Form is offered in an attempt to increase awareness of the student’s individual needs in support of the student’s success. The Placement Support Form is a working document. Students, the program and/or the placement may make changes to this form based on an evaluation of accommodation needs after placement begins.

The purpose of the Placement Support Form is:

To act as a communication document that the student can share with those involved with his/her placement.

To provide a structured, strengths-based approach to discussing accommodation needs on placement.

To allow collaboration, when required, between academic and clinical faculty, college placement liaisons and on-site supervisors when planning for placement accommodations

Using the Placement Support Form:

The Accessibility Counsellor will discuss the use of the Placement Support form with the student. Use of the Support Form is ultimately the student’s decision. If the student decides to use the Placement Support form, the Accessibility Counsellor, with support of the Adaptive Technologist/Learning Skills Advisor if needed, will:&

  1. Work collaboratively with the student to develop each section of the form
  2. Consult with program coordinators, placement liaisons, instructors, and administrators regarding the placement accommodation needs of the student, where appropriate, and with consent of the student
  3. Guide the student to share the agreed upon Placement Support Form with his/her direct supervisor on placement, with support from the academic and clinical faculty (if necessary)

Student Tips for Use

For students using the Placement Support form we recommend considering the following:

  • Be sure you are comfortable with discussing all of the information on the Placement Support Form as your placement supervisor will likely ask you questions
  • Disclosing to your direct supervisor on placement is usually best. If you do not know who that person is, ask your placement coordinator
  • Your Placement Support Form has been designed to focus on the positive. Be sure to emphasize the strengths you bring to placement.
  • It is often helpful to “script” what you plan to say when disclosing information on the Placement Support Form. Your Accessibility Counsellor can assist you with developing your disclosure script.
  • You are not required to disclose disability diagnosis. However, you can choose to do so if you feel comfortable
  • Plan and schedule follow-up discussions with your placement supervisor to assess the effectiveness of placement accommodations and to determine if changes to the Placement Support Form need to be made.

 

Student Responsibilities:

  • To co-operate in obtaining necessary documentation of a disability, including medical and other expert opinions
  • To inform their college’s Accessibility counsellor and their on-site placement supervisor, in a timely manner, of their need for placement accommodation
  • To participate in discussions about their accommodations
  • To provide on-going feedback about the effectiveness of the present accommodations

 

Accessible Learning Services and Program Responsibilities: 

  • To help students identify and explain functional limitations of disability and the impact these limitations may have within placement environments.
  • To assist students with completion of the placement support form.
  • To help facilitate a process between academic and clinical faculty, college placement liaisons, and on-site supervisors with the goal of determining reasonable placement accommodations.

 

Placement Responsibilities:

  • To accept requests for accommodation in good faith
  • To maintain the confidentiality of students with disabilities
  • To deal with accommodation requests in a timely manner
  • To collaborate with placement students, academic and clinical faculty, college placement liaisons, and on-site supervisors to develop accommodations that follow the principles of dignity, individualization, inclusion and full participation

 

Need Field or Clinical Placement Accommodations?

Speak with your Accessibility Counsellor or contact Accessible Learning Services at:
Phone: 905-575-2211

Email als [at] mohawkcollege.ca

Or drop in to the ALS location at your campus

FM System Accommodation Guide

FM Systems: What are they and how do they work?

A Frequency Modulated (FM) system is a wireless communication device used to support persons who are heard of hearing. It consists of a transmitter, also referred to as a microphone, and a receiver. The transmitter acts like a radio transmitter, which picks up the signal, usually the speech of the person using the device, and delivers it to the listener. The receiver may be attached to a hearing aid, be an ear-level "stand alone" device, or be a speaker that is in the listening environment.

Using an FM system enhances "signal-to- noise" ratio, or the amount of signal, that can be heard in relation to the competing information in the environment.

Poor signal to noise ratio contributes to poor speech intelligibility, which is problematic for a listener with hearing loss, auditory processing disorder, or conditions such as traumatic brain injury.

Tips for Using an FM System:

  • Speak in a normal tone of voice with the microphone approximately 14 cm from your mouth. Your voice will be amplified, but remember that no hearing aid will allow your student to hear exactly as they would if they had no hearing loss.
  • A personal hearing aid works best within a 2 to 3 meter radius. Beyond that, other background noise will interfere. It is important to be aware of this range for direct instruction and group activities.
  • An FM system will transmit for a distance of approximately 45 feet. The clarity of the signal and the amount of information received depend on the student's loss and ability to process the information heard. The student may need to have a clear view of the speaker to receive all of the information. The larger classroom / lab environments or outdoors may be difficult listening environments even though the FM system has an extended range.
  • For in class discussions, pass the transmitter to the speaker or, if working in small groups, place it in a central location
  • It is beneficial if the instructor repeats questions asked by classmates so that the student wearing the FM system will be aware of the discussion topic.
  • Remember to take the transmitter microphone off when having private conversations or situations that the student should not be privy to.

Group Assignments/ Projects Accommodation Guide

Overview

Developing the skills needed to complete group assignments and projects is an essential program requirement for most programs. For some students with disabilities, accommodations are required in order to complete group assignments and projects.

Accommodations required include:

  • Professor/Instructor assistance to integrate the student into a group
  • Professor/Instructor assistance with understanding the student’s role and function within a group

 

Group Assignments/Projects and the Extensions on Assignments Accommodation:

  • Students with the Extensions on Assignments accommodation should discuss the potential need for any extension proactively with the course professor/instructor to determine how requesting an extension, if required, may impact a group assignment or project.
  • When a student requests an extension on a group assignment or project, professors can request that students submit the work they have completed up to the date of the extension request. This is to ensure that students remain on track with group assignments or projects and receive the feedback they may need to continue to complete the assignment.
  • Certain group assignments and projects may be arranged in a way that requires all group members to be present to perform a time-sensitive learning task that is difficult to replicate (e.g., studio and media courses, group performances). Thus, there may not be an opportunity for one group member to request an extension. When extensions for an entire group are not possible, professors/ instructors should consult with the student and the student’s Accessibility Counsellor to determine what options, if any, may be available.

 

Suggested Group Assignment or Project teaching strategies:

  • Provide students with guidance on how to address any challenges that may occur within groups
  • Suggest students develop a group contract that clearly outlines each group member’s role
  • Offer a diversified way for group members to participate in group projects (e.g., Skype, Email, Social Media) rather than relying solely on in-person group meetings
  • Provide check-ins with groups to help monitor progress with group assignments/projects

Guide to Disability Documentation

Disability documentation that confirms disability and the potential functional impact within a college environment is required to access accommodations. To access Federal and/or Provincial funding for educationally necessary assistive devices, diagnostic services, and other academic supports, confirmation of a permanent disability is required; however, the disability diagnosis does not need to be specified. The following guide will provide students with the information they need to gather disability documentation and register with ALS.

When gathering disability documentation, keep in mind that current documentation is the most helpful when discussing your need for accommodations and support. To obtain the most recent documentation available,

  • Your Registered Health Care Professional (RHCP)
  • The high school or school board last attended
  • Your disability service provider such as W.S.I.B.

Understanding Your Disability Documentation:

Here are some questions that will guide you as you review your documentation:

  • What is the potential impact of my disability within a college environment?
  • What accommodations and support does my documentation say would be helpful
  • Are there medical or mental health supports that my documentation indicates would be helpful while I am going to school?

Disability Diagnosis and Types of Documentation:

The Medical Documentation Form is available at (Link). If a student is applying for OSAP, and has completed the Disability Verification Form (DVF), the DVF can be used to support accommodation needs.

Disability       

Documentation

Learning Disability

(Diagnosed)

A copy of your latest comprehensive psychoeducational assessment, completed by a registered psychologist or psychological associate, which includes a diagnosis of learning disability. An assessment completed within the last 5 years or since 18 years or older, is more relevant for an adult student.

 

  • The Learning Disability Association of Ontario (LDAO) definition of learning disability to be used when making LD diagnosis (http://ldao.ca/)
  • The psychoeducational assessment should include recommendation for accommodations and support
  • Accessible Learning Services will work with students to update their psychoeducational assessment as required

 

 

Learning Disability (Identification through IEP or IPRC process, but no formal diagnosis)

Most recent documents from school: Individual Educational Plan (IEP) and/or Identification, Placement and Review Committee (IPRC)

 

NOTE: If documentation is an IEP, Accessible Learning Services will provide interim or temporary accommodations while an updated psychoeducational assessment is obtained. Interim accommodations may include extended time on test and access to the testing centre.

 

Options for funding a psychoeducational assessment include:

  1. Apply for OSAP. If you are eligible for OSAP funding, the Bursary for students with Disabilities (BSWD) can cover all or most of the cost of psychoeducational assessment.
  2. Contact any insurance plan under which you are covered to determine if psychological services are an eligible expense
  3. Contact a psychologist from the roster provided by Accessible Learning Services
  4. Pay for the assessment using your own funds. If eligible for OSAP, students who have privately funded an assessment completed within 6 months prior to start of their program may qualify for reimbursement through BSWD.

 

Mental Health Disability

Documentation from a Physician, Psychiatrist, Psychologist or Psychological Associate which includes a:

 

  • Description of the potential impacts of the disability within a college setting
  • Potential impact of medications on academic functioning
  • Recommended accommodations and support

 

Complete MDF or DVF

Acquired Brain Injury (ABI)

A comprehensive report from a physician, neurologist, neuropsychologist or RHCP that includes:

 

  • Diagnosis (voluntary)
  • Potential impact of medications on academic functioning
  • Potential impact of disability within a college setting
  • A copy of most recent neuropsychological assessment, as applicable
  • Recommended accommodations and support

 

Complete MDF or DVF

Medical Disability

A letter from a physician or RHCP which includes:

 

  • Diagnosis (voluntary)
  • Potential impact of disability within a college setting
  • Recommended accommodation and support

 

Complete MDF or DVF

Physical/ Mobility

A letter from a physician or RHCP that includes:

 

  • Diagnosis (voluntary)
  • Description of strengths and limitations
  • Potential impact of disability within a college setting
  • Any use of assistive devices
  • Specialized equipment
  • Environmental adaptations required
  • Potential impact of disability within a college setting
  • Recommended accommodations and support

 

Complete MDF or DVF

Blind and Low Vision

A letter from a physician, or RHCP that includes:

 

  • Diagnosis
  • Potential impact of disability within a college environment
  • Recommended accommodations and support including any adaptive technology needs (i.e. JAWS, Kurzweil, etc.)

 

Complete MDF or DVF

Deaf, Deafness, Hard of Hearing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A letter from a physician, or copy of the most recent Audiology Report that includes:

 

  • Diagnosis
  • Potential impact of disability within a college setting
  • Recommended accommodation and support including appropriate technical support (e.g. hearing aids, FM system)

 

Complete MDF or DVF

Temporary Disability

A letter from the student’s physician or RHCP which includes:

 

  • If the condition is temporary or chronic
  • Potential impact of condition within a college setting
  • Recommended accommodations and support

 

Complete MDF or DVF

Attention Deficit/ Hyperactivity

Disorder (ADHD)

 

A copy of your latest comprehensive psychoeducational assessment, completed by a registered psychologist or psychological associate. An assessment completed within the last 3-5 years, or at the age of 18 years or older, is more relevant for an adult student.

 

Accessible Learning Services will work with students to update their psychoeducational assessment.

 

A letter and/or formal assessment/treatment report from a physician, psychiatrist, neuropsychologist, psychologist or psychological associate that includes:

 

  • Description of current level of functioning
  • Relevant personal and academic histories
  • Description of the nature of current symptoms and their potential impact within a college setting
  • Potential impact of medications on academic functioning
  • Recommended accommodations and supports

 

 Complete MDF or DVF

Autism

Documentation from a Physician, Psychiatrist, Psychologist or Psychological Associate which includes a:

 

  • Description of the potential impacts of the disability within a college setting
  • Recommended accommodations and support

 

Complete MDF or DVF

Intellectual Disability

Documentation from a Physician, Psychiatrist, Psychologist or Psychological Associate which includes a:

 

  • Description of the potential impacts of the disability within a college setting
  • Recommended accommodations and support

 

Interpreter Accommodation Guide

Mohawk College recognizes that Interpreters play an important role in the academic success of students who are Deaf, deafened, or hard of hearing. Mohawk College adheres to the guidelines put in place by the College Committee on Disability Issues (CCDI). For more information please see:

http://www.disabilityissues.ca

Process of having an Interpreter in class:

  • At the beginning of each semester, allow the students who is Deaf, deafened, or hard of hearing the choice to introduce and explain the role of an Interpreter in the classroom.
  • Maintain the same expectations for students who are Deaf, deafened, or hard of hearing that you have for all students.
  • When addressing a student who is Deaf, deafened, or hard of hearing, speak directly to and facing him/her. Avoid using phrases addressed to the Interpreter. The Interpreter will interpret what is being said/signed.
  • Avoid turning your back on the student while you are speaking.
  • The interpreting process can only accommodation one person speaking at a time. Monitor class interactions and discussions making sure that everyone speaks clearly and in turn.
  • In order to accommodation the students visual needs, the Interpreter will position themselves close to the instructor, the board, and/ or multimedia equipment.
  • When captioned media is used, the Interpreter may still need to provide an interpretation for the purpose of full comprehension.

 

What else can instructors do:

  • Try to incorporate visual aids and look for closed captioned videos/movies.
  • Repeat questions originated by students in the class at large, rewording for clarity when necessary.
  • Interpreters, as part of the teaching team, will require all materials (course outline, textbooks, notes, list of videos and their transcripts, etc.) in advance.
  • In order to ensure continuous provision of services, please consult with Accessible Learning Services, prior to any proposed schedule changes.
  • Please ensure that you are familiar with the student’s Confidential Academic Accommodation Plan (CAAP).
  • Should you require interpreting services for any other student related situation (e.g, course seminars, trips), please contact Accessible Learning Services in advance.
  • If the student has not arrived within 20 minutes of the start of the scheduled class, the Interpreter will leave.
  • If concerns arise regarding interpreting services, please speak with the classroom Interpreter and consult with Accessible Learning Services. 

Memory Aid Accommodation Guide

What is a Memory Aid?

A memory aid is an academic accommodation that is used to cue or trigger recall of information that the student has learned. The memory aid is student-created and is intended to allow equal opportunity to demonstrate competence, and to display knowledge and understanding of course content. A memory aid is uniquely developed and can be in a variety of formats (visual, auditory/digital/tactile/other).

A Memory Aid is Not

A memory aid is not meant to record all the facts, concepts or processes being tested. A memory aid does not compromise academic integrity. A memory aid is not helpful to students that have not engaged in class content or do not comprehend the material. A memory aid is not any of the following:

  • A “cheat sheet”
  • Actual course/textbook content – only triggers and cues
  • Full course notes or an answer sheet
  • Specific examples of how formulas are used unless allowed by the professor.
  • A formula sheet – A formula sheet is a specific type of testing accommodation for math and/or science courses.

 

How is a Memory Aid determined?

The memory aid accommodation is determined by the Accessibility Counsellor after reviewing the student’s documentation. The accommodation appears on the “Testing Accommodations” section of the CAAP. The Accommodation Letter may also indicate the use of a formula sheet. A formula sheet is a specific type of testing accommodation which contains formulas for math/science based courses. Some students may have accommodations for both memory aid and formula sheet.

Process for using memory aid accommodation:

  1. The Accessibility Counsellor approves the memory aid accommodation and puts it on the student’s CAAP.
  2. The Accessibility Counsellor refers student to the Adaptive Technologist and Learning Skills Advisor for training on creating a memory aid.
  3. Faculty and student discuss memory aid format and time lines. Development of the memory aid should be at least 5 days in advance of the test or at another mutually agreed upon time.
  4. The student books his/her test, and will indicate “memory aid for tests/exams” in the OTHER section on the accommodations page of the online test booking system.
  5. The student creates his/her memory aid.
  6. The memory aid is given to the professor for approval. The professor will approve the memory aid, if it maintains the integrity of the test. Faculty are encouraged to provide feedback and have final approval over the content of the memory aid.
  7. The professor will attach the memory aid to the test/exam booked in the testing centre. Only the mutually agreed upon memory aid will be allowed during the test.

Memory Aid Formats

There are a wide range of possible formats for the memory aid based upon the student’s learning style.

  • Visual - Pictures, symbols, diagrams, mind maps Language Based - acronyms, acrostics, and keywords
  • Tactile - Manipulatives and/or other tactile objects or creations Auditory – Language based cues in an auditory format
  • Digital - Any of the above could be submitted via a USB for students unable to access paper format.

 

Did You?

  • Email your CAAP to your professor?
  • Let your professor know you will be using a memory aid and set a timeline to go over your memory aid?
  • Meet with your Adaptive Technologist/Learning Skills Advisor for memory aid support?
  • Share your memory aid with your professor?
  • Include the memory aid accommodation when you book your test?
  • Only include cues and triggers to help recall material during the test?

 

Peer Support Assistance Guide

Mohawk College recognizes assistance from a peer may be an important accommodation for students with physical or sensory-related disabilities to enhance accessibility on campus or to facilitate classroom engagement activities.

An evidence-based practice informs the decision to utilize this accommodation

Where appropriate, the Accessibility Counsellor and student will implement other college services and supports that may meet the student’s accommodation need prior to making a decision to proceed with peer support assistance. Other College services include informal support from peers in a course, scheduled mentoring time with students on placement with Accessible Learning Services, tutoring (internal and/or external resources), learning skills instruction, which could include an introduction to adaptive technology, as well as regular appointments with an Accessibility Support Officer.

When other college services and supports have been utilized, and peer support assistance has been determined to be an additional response to address a student’s accommodation need, a student may trial peer support assistance in one (1) or two (2) priority courses, or all courses if required.

During a trial period, the student, Accessibility Counsellor, Community Resource Support Officer, peer support assistant and professor collaboratively determine effectiveness of the accommodation and determine if adjustments need to be made.

What is the process to obtain peer support assistance?

In order for the accommodation to be considered, a student meets with an Accessibility Counsellor to discuss when and what type of supports could be needed and to review their relevant disability documentation which collaborates the need for 1:1 supports. The use of this accommodation is included on the Accommodation Letter.

What type of supports have been provided?

  • operation of elevators, lifts, sit/stand desk, note taking technology
  • opening doors, lockers
  • set-up/pack-up personal items in classrooms or during meal breaks
  • co-support to service animals
  • sighted guide, orientation to accessibility features on campus
  • description of visual elements during lecture
  • Where required, facilitation of classroom engagement activities. The scope of peer support assistance when facilitating classroom engagement activities could include: reminders to remain on task, reading, scribing, transcription, involvement in group settings, review of class notes and other materials, some of which may occur outside of class hours such as the development of homework check list, sending email reminders of upcoming test/assignments, monitoring eLearn progress with the student, reminders to complete Online test booking at least 7 days in advance of test/exams, and supplemental notetaking support such as ensuring the student uses notetaking technology effectively, and captures key lectures points.

 

How is the accommodation funded?

If Students are not accessing personal funds to cover the cost of this accommodation, students should apply for financial assistance through the Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP) to gain access to the Bursary for Students with Disabilities (BSWD) to cover the cost of this accommodation. Students can speak with their Accessibility Counsellor to explore funding options. Link to the College’s webpage for Financial Assistance:

https://www.mohawkcollege.ca/student-life-at-mohawk/financial-assistance

Who is the Peer Support Assistant?

A Peer Support Assistant is typically a registered Mohawk College student but can also be Alumni or a community person. The position is advertised as a paid position and the hourly rate of payment is set by the College each semester. Registered students who provide the supports also receive a Co-curricular record from the College to acknowledge the invaluable confidential service to other students.

Post-Secondary Education Guide for Parents and Caregivers of Students with Disabilities

Early Identification

Students are encouraged to connect with Accessible Learning Services at least 3 months prior the start of the semester.

Accessible Learning Services works in collaboration with students, faculty and staff. Together, we identify and implement accommodations and services to ensure that all students can have an equal opportunity to achieve educational goals.

Parent/Caregiver Support

As the role of the student changes upon attending post- secondary, so does the role of the parents and caregivers. Parents and caregivers play an integral part in supporting their student to transition to a self-advocating, independent adult. This transition, with parental and caregiver support, is particularly important for individuals with disabilities who are planning to attend Mohawk College.

Team Members

As your student transitions to college, you will find a vast team available to support your student and their disability related needs which include Accessibility Counsellors, Accessibility Support Officers, Learning Skills Advisors and Assistive Technologists, and Testing Centre staff. We encourage students to use the resources that are available and applicable to their individual requirements.

Attendant Care

While Mohawk College does not provide attendant care services for students, Accessible Learning Services can help facilitate the application process. For more information on how your student can acquire attendant care services at college and residence please see the Center for Independent Living Toronto website (www.cilt.ca).

Getting Ready

  1. Funding Post-Secondary Education

It is important for students to think about financial costs and develop a plan to pay for their post-secondary education. In addition to savings, funding for education may be supplemented through a number of programs for students. Students are encouraged to visit the Financial Assistance website for options on funding post-secondary education and grants that may be available for students with disabilities.

2. Documentation

As a parent or caregiver you can support your student to gather and be knowledgeable about their disability documentation. Students should gather the following relevant documentation:

  • IEP/IPRC documentation- most recent
  • Psycho-educational Assessment
  • Neuro-psych Assessment
  • Medical documentation

 

For more information on how your student can acquire of update his/her documentation please see the Guide to Disability Documentation at: https://www.mohawkcollege.ca/student-life/academics/accessible-learning/accessible-learning-services-resources

Communication Support

Students who require an Interpreter to attend meetings, may contact Accessible Learning Services via email als [at] mohawkcollege.ca and appropriate arrangements will be made.

3. Register with Accessible Learning Services

Your student should contact Accessible Learning Services (ALS), as soon as they have received confirmation of acceptance.

Students can register with Accessible Learning Services online at https://www.mohawkcollege.ca/form/als-intake-form

For additional information regarding registration, students can contact Accessible Learning Services at: 905-575-2211

 

Student’s Role:

Students are responsible for:

  • Registering with Accessible Learning Services.
  • Students may choose to have someone attend their intake appointment with them.
  • Providing documentation in a timely manner.
  • Following procedures and deadlines for requesting and accessing accommodations.
  • Distributing and discussing accommodations with each instructor.
  • Updating Accessible Learning Services if accommodations are not being met or needs have changed.

 

Parent’s Role:

Parents and caregivers can offer transition support to their student by:

  • Helping students identify their strengths.
  • Encouraging the student to connect with campus services and activities.
  • Promoting decision making and providing support and as students develop educational goals.
  • If an updated psychoeducational assessment is needed, looking into your insurance benefits to determine what portion of the assessment can be covered.
  • Providing support and encouragement as your student navigates through the exciting and often stressful transition to, post-secondary education.

 

Accessible Learning Services Role:

Accessible Learning Services offers support by:

  • Meeting with students to support their transition to Mohawk College.
  • Reviewing documentation and obtaining additional documentation as required, including funding options (i.e. updated psycho- educational assessment, medical documentation, etc.).
  • Working with students to create an accommodation plan to support disability related needs.
  • Assessing students for learning and adaptive technology needs, and providing services and resources to support access and/or facilitate loan or purchase of equipment.
  • Providing alternative format materials.

 

The Duty to Accommodate

Accommodations are changes in the traditional rules and procedures surrounding teaching and testing which allow students with disabilities to participate on a ‘level playing field’.

In Ontario, post-secondary institutions have ‘a duty to accommodate’ students with disabilities. This means that institutions are expected to make every reasonable effort to accommodate students with disabilities.

Accessible Learning Services and your student work together to develop an accommodation plan.

Please be aware that Accessible Learning Services may need time to arrange accommodations.

Confidentiality

The Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA) guides Mohawk College’s confidentiality and consent policies. While Accessible Learning Services recognizes the value of parent and caregiver support, completion of an external consent form is required to discuss a student’s accommodation needs with a parent or caregiver.

Presentation Accommodation Guide

Presentations Accommodation Guide

Students who require presentation accommodations have a disability that significantly impacts their ability to fully demonstrate their knowledge through classroom presentations. In order for presentation accommodations to be offered, the student must present Accessible Learning Services with documentation from a regulation health care professional (e.g. physician, psychologist, and psychiatrist) that supports this accommodation. 

For the purpose of accommodation, a presentation refers to any individual or group assignment that must be presented to the class in some manner.

Presentation Accommodation Procedure

  1. The student provides Accessible Learning Services with documentation from a regulated health care professional supporting the need for presentation accommodations.
  2. The Accessibility Counsellor updates the Confidential Academic Accommodation Plan to include this accommodation, as well as reviews options for presentation accommodations with the student.
  • This accommodation will be noted in the Classroom Accommodations section of the CAAP as:

Student has a disability that significantly impacts his/her ability to present content in front of a group of peers. Please see the Presentation Accommodations document that accompanies this CAAP.

  1. The student will discuss the presentation accommodations with his/her faculty and agree on a suitable accommodation.

Suggestions for Presentation Accommodations

Alternative Setting/Audience

  • Presenting individually to the professor.
  • Presenting to the professor plus a small group (3-4) (This can fulfill any requirements to answer questions/provide feedback based on presentation, or reflect on peer evaluation.

 

In Class Accommodations

  • In the case of individual presentation, option to present as a pair or group.
  • Choice in when to complete the presentation (date and/ or beginning, middle or end of class).
  • Permission to read from notes, handouts, or a script without marks being deducted for this.
  • Sitting at a table or desk while presenting.
  • For some students, scripted or predictable portions of a presentation (PowerPoint) does not impact disability where unscripted and unpredictable (question/answer period) portions do.

-In these instances, the student will meet with his/her faculty member to discuss alternatives (i.e. having questions emailed to the student for written response.)

Adaptive Technology

  • Video and/or record the presentation to show in class.
  • Develop the presentation using software that permits audio recording be embedded into slides.

 

Diversified Learning Approach

  • If presentation skills are not a core competency of the course and/or being evaluated, the option for a student to present the materials in an alternative manner (essay, video, resource binder, etc.)

-This alternative presentation of materials would be graded based on the same rubric as class presentations.

Additional Notes:

Please note, this is not an exhaustive list of suggestions, and students are encouraged to negotiate and collaborate with their professors to arrive at an accommodation that is mutually agreeable. Additionally, Accessible Learning Services, Accessibility Counsellors are available to support the development of this accommodation as well as discuss any questions, concerns, or feedback.

Reduced Course Load and Tuition Fee Policy for Students with Permanent Disabilities Accommodation Guide

Important Information

The reduced course load accommodation refers to reducing the number of courses per semester. Reducing a course load does not mean fewer assignments for a course.

Reduced Course Load as an Accommodation

Many students with disabilities find it necessary to take fewer courses per semester as an accommodation. The benefits of a reduced course load include:

  • A more manageable workload
  • More time to access necessary supports
  • The ability to opt in to full-time benefits while taking less than a full-time course load

 

When the reduced course load accommodation is accessed, students must eventually take all courses in a program of study to graduate. Often, students who reduce their course load require an additional year or more to complete their program of study.

OSAP and Course Load Percentage

Students with permanent disabilities must maintain at least a 40% course load for OSAP purposes. If the student is accessing OSAP, and is concerned that the that the number of courses dropped will be below 40% of a full time course load, the student should see a Financial Assistance Advisor to determine course load percentage prior to dropping any course.

Documentation Requirements

Students accessing the reduced course load accommodation must provide Accessible Learning Services with documentation that recommends a reduced course load. The student’s Accessibility Counsellor will assist with determining the type of documentation required.

How to Access the Reduced Course Load Accommodation

Once it is determined that a reduced course load is needed, the procedure below should be followed:

  • The student meets with an Accessibility Counsellor and requests the reduced course load accommodations.
  • The Accessibility Counsellors reviews the student’s documentation to ensure that the reduced course load accommodation is supported. the Accessibility Counsellor will guide the student on how to obtain the required documentation.
  • The Accessibility Counsellor adds the reduced course load accommodation to the Student’s Accommodation Letter.
  • The student and Accessibility Counsellor determine the desired number of courses to drop per semester.
  • The student contacts the coordinator of their program to request a list of courses that can safely be dropped.
  • Based on the coordinator’s recommendation, the student drops courses through their MyMohawk Registration Menu.
  • Prior to each semester, the student will need to contact their coordinator to determine a list of courses that can be dropped for the currently registered semester.
  • When selecting courses, it is recommended that a student initially choose a full block of courses and drop courses when notified by their coordinator as to which courses can be dropped.

 

How to Access the Tuition Fee Policy

Students who require a reduced course load as an accommodation for a permanent disability may be eligible for reduced tuition fees for the final courses needed to complete program.

What students need to know about the Tuition Fee Policy:

  • To be eligible, a student must have a permanent disability and provide Accessible Learning Services with documentation that supports the need for a reduced course load as an accommodation. Documentation must have a specific statement that indicates the need for a reduced course load. The student’s Accessibility Counsellor will guide the student on documentation requirements for the Tuition Fee Policy.
  • The student is required to pay the same amount of tuition for a program as other students completing the same program in the typical duration of the program of study.
  • The student will be notified through MyMohawk email when eligible for the Tuition Fee Policy. Once eligible, the student is required to pay full fees for courses upon registration. An adjustment will be applied to the student’s account at least 3 weeks after the start of the semester. If a refund is applicable, a cheque will be issued and will either be mailed to the student’s address, or sent to the National Student Loans Services Centre (NSLSC) to reduce the student’s OSAP loan. The Tuition Fee Policy does not include Ancillary Fees.
  • The Tuition Fee Policy agreement covers the program in which the student is registered. Typically, this is the program listed on the Tuition Fee Policy Agreement form. If the student changes programs, a new agreement form must be completed, and the student’s eligibility will be re-evaluated from the start of the new program.
  • The Tuition Fee Policy does not cover courses that are withdrawn from or failed. Students are required to drop course(s) during the drop/add period, which is the first 10 days of the semester. Students should refer to the Important Academic Dates Calendar in MyMohawk for more information on drop/add dates for each semester.

 

Completing Dropped Courses during your Program of Study

If a student takes courses previously dropped during the year over the summer, or through Continuing Education (i.e. online, evenings or weekends), the student is required to pay for those courses separately.

BUT, once the student has paid enough tuition fees to equal the amount of tuition that would normally be charged for their FULL program, the student will be eligible for the Tuition Fee Policy for any courses still needed to complete a program.

If a student is considered part-time, the tuition amount and ancillary fees will be adjusted accordingly. This may result in the student taking longer to reach the threshold of full tuition.

The Tuition Fee Policy and Course Load Percentages

  • The Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP) and the Ministry of Colleges and Universities (MCU) have different definitions of full-time and part-time student status.
  • For OSAP, a student with a permanent disability is considered full-time for the purposes of receiving funding through OSAP if the student is taking no less than 40% of a full time course load.
  • Mohawk College uses the MCU definition and considers a student full-time if the student is taking 66% of higher of a course load, and part-time if the student is taking below 66% of a full-time course load.
  • Course load percentages are calculated based on the number of course hours a student is taking rather than the number of courses in a semester.
  • Students who are accessing a reduced course load may be considered a full-time student for OSAP purposes, but part-time under College’s definition.

 

Opting into Full-Time Benefits

A student accessing a reduced course load who is considered part-time using the College definition can opt in to full time benefits so that the costs of these benefits are part of the student’s tuition. Full-time benefits include access to the David Braley Athletic and Recreation Centre, Student Health Insurance, and HSR Bus Pass. Instructions and timeline to opt out of the health insurance are located on the MSA website. The students Accessibility Counsellor will discuss the need to opt-in to benefits.

Secondary School Educators Guide

We support students with disabilities to transition to Mohawk College

Mohawk College is committed to assisting our educational partners in the community help their students transition to Mohawk. For students with disabilities, and those that suspect they have a disability, registering with Accessible Learning Services early helps facilitate a smoother transition, and may facilitate long-term academic success. This document is meant to assist secondary school educators while they support students with disabilities to transition to Mohawk College.

Important Notes
Early Identification --- While there is not a deadline to register, connecting with Accessible Learning Services at least 3 months prior the start of the semester is strongly recommended. For students with high accommodation needs (for example blind, low vision, deaf, hard of hearing) registering with Accessible Learning Services 5 months prior to the start of the semester is recommended.

Support Teams and Their Roles
Secondary School Educator Role
Secondary school educators can offer transitional support to students by:

  • Assisting the student to access career counselling available at secondary school to ensure good program fit.
  • Preparing a package of disability related documentation for the student to then give to Accessible Learning Services along with their intake form.
  • Supporting students to obtain an updated psychoeducational assessment if funding is available through the school board or guardian’s insurance.
  • Informing students that they are responsible for providing their disability documentation to Accessible Learning Services and advising them that the secondary school will not be sending their documentation automatically.
  • Helping students to articulate their strengths and challenges.
  • Encouraging students to connect with campus services and activities.
  • Promoting decision making and providing support and understanding for students as they develop their own educational goals.
  • Providing support and encouragement.

 

Student’s Role

  • The independence Mohawk College offers means that students are responsible for:
  • Disclosing their disability to Accessible Learning Services.
  • Disclosing is at the sole discretion of the student.
  • Providing appropriate disability documentation in a timely manner.
  • Following procedures for requesting and accessing accommodations.
  • Distributing their accommodation plan and discussing accommodations as needed.
  • Updating Accessible Learning Services if their accommodations are not being met or their needs have changed.

 

Mohawk Accessible Learning Services Role
Accessible Learning Services offers support by:

  • Meeting with students to support their transition to Mohawk College (after student is a confirmed applicant).
  • Reviewing disability documentation and guiding students to obtain additional documentation as required, including funding options (i.e. updated psycho- educational assessment, medical documentation, etc.).
  • Working with students to create an accommodation plan to support disability related needs.
  • Consulting with faculty, staff and community agencies as needed to meet accommodation requirements.
  • Assessing students for learning and adaptive technology needs, and providing services and resources to support access and/or facilitate purchase.
  • Providing alternative format materials.

 

Important Notes

Students Being their Own Advocate --- Mohawk College students are considered independent adults and are expected to communicate directly with Accessible Learning Services, professors and College staff.

Teaching Students with Autism (ASD) Faculty Guide

The information provided is to support a students with ASD in your course and is supplemental to the student’s Confidential Academic Accommodation Plan. The impact of disability varies in severity for each student. Therefore, the strengths and challenges associated with ASD cannot be broadly applied to all students.

Definition

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a neurological disability which impacts social communication and social interaction to varying degrees. Persons with ASD may have difficulty with:

  • Reciprocity in conversations
  • Initiating and responding to social interactions
  • Understanding nonverbal communication
  • Developing, understanding, and maintaining relationships

 

Persons with ASD may also have restricted and repetitive patterns of behaviour, interests, and activities which may include:

  • Insistence on sameness with routines
  • Highly fixed interests
  • Sensitivity to sights, sounds, touch

 

Strengths of ASD

Many students with ASD:

  • Have an accurate and detailed memory for information and facts.
  • Have excellent visual recall, especially when manipulating data for useful purposes.
  • May be able to concentrate for long periods of time on a task.
  • Strong inclination to be truthful and honest with others.

 

Challenges of ASD

Many students with ASD may:

  • Have difficulty with social situation and finding interactions with others challenging.
  • Find understanding and use of certain nonverbal aspects of communication challenging (e.g. eye-to-eye gaze, facial expressions, body postures, gestures, proximity to speaker.)
  • Speak with little inflection or emphasis; voice may be monotone, too loud, or too soft.
  • Find spontaneous, reciprocal sharing of information with others challenging (e.g. conversations about interests or hobbies.)
  • Have difficulty establishing and maintaining relationships.
  • Have echolalia (repeating what is heard). The repeated words/phrases may be spoken aloud or only lip movements.
  • Have a tendency to become preoccupied with topics or ideas that others may see as irrelevant.
  • Have difficulty with idioms and other abstract forms of language.
  • Think in ways that are divergent and abstract- “deep thinkers”.
  • Depend heavily on routines and want things to “stay the same” so that there are no “surprises”
  • Have unusual sensitivity to sights, sounds, smell, tastes.

 

Teaching Strategies

The following strategies may be helpful when teaching a student with ASD. Offer additional explanation of abstract concepts and providing students with opportunities to clarify any misunderstood content.

  • Provide both verbal and written explanations for assignments/projects.
  • Ensure that you have his/her full attention and ask the student to summarize what has been discussed.
  • Gently remind or redirect the student if they are not making eye contact, speaking to loudly, too softly, or standing too close while talking.
  • If the student is providing information that is off-topic during class discussions, a gentle reminder to focus on the discussion topic will redirect the student.
  • Explain figurative language (idioms, metaphor, and simile), when possible, as mangy students with ASD find figurative language challenging.
  • Provide information well in advance of changes in routine (when/if possible) is beneficial.

For example, changes in tests dates, room locations, and assignment/ project completion details can all be difficult to manage for the students if not given some advanced notice.

  • Provide as much structure as possible during change in routine, as a student with ASD may experience elevated levels of stress and anxiety.
  • Be explicit and verbal with feelings. Alternatively, the professor may choose to explain nonverbal language such as gestures.

For example, stating, “When I step back as you move closer to me, it means…” may help the student understand the message behind the gesture.

  • It is often helpful to have a conversation with the student about any challenging behaviour and let the student know your expectations regarding behaviour.

 

Additional Social Information for the Classroom

Often, students with ASD need support and guidance when attempting to establish a peer relationship. As the professor, you may wish to facilitate interaction between the student with ASD and his/her peers. For example, it can be helpful for you to locate several students who are willing to take some time to make a connection with their classmate with ASD.

Group work is one of the most challenging aspects facing students with ASD in a classroom setting. It is helpful if roles within the group are clearly defined. Also, if groups are not assigned by the professor, the student may need assistance joining a group.

If you choose to do so, you can provide your professors with additional information below on how ASD impacts you.

Discussing this Guide with the Student

You may wish to discuss information in this guide with the student in more detail in a private, confidential manner. The student’s Accessible Learning Services Counsellor is available to assist with strategies and accommodations to support the student in your course.

Video Recording Accommodation Guide

Overview

Students who require video recording of lectures have a disability that impacts the ability to efficiently process verbal and visual information presented in class. As such, the student will benefit from revisiting verbal and visual lecture information in order to effectively learn concepts.

Video recording aids comprehension when learning objectives are delivered in a highly visual format, and where audio recording alone would not be adequate.

Video recordings give students the ability to review material that they might have missed or not grasped when initially delivered in class. As a result, all students can benefit from video recordings and instructors are encouraged to take the lead and create recordings as part of a Universal Design for Learning. Instructors can contact the Centre for Teaching and Learning for technological assistance.

Video Recording Guidelines

To qualify for this accommodation, the student must present the Accessibility Counsellor with documentation from a regulated health care professional (e.g. physician, psychologist and psychiatrist) that supports video recording of lectures.

The Accessibility Counsellor updates the CAAP to include this accommodation as well as reviews these guidelines with the student.

The student emails an initial or revised CAAP to the professor of the course where the video recording accommodation will be used.

The professor reviews the Student Agreement found on the last page of this guide with the student.

Video recording of lectures is allowable under existing Canadian copyright legislation, due to the exception of fair dealing. For those interested in accessing more information about copyright law as it relates to fair dealing and exceptions please refer to the Canadian Intellectual Property Office website at:

http://strategis.ic.gc.ca/sc_mrksv/cipo/cp/copy_gd_protect-_e.html#section06

However, at the discretion of the professor, video recording may be prohibited during lectures that involve discussion on topics that may yield personal or confidential information and are likely to involve a degree of self-disclosure. If there are specific circumstances in which it is deemed inappropriate to record a particular class (or portion of class), all efforts will be made to inform the student well in advance. In circumstances where recording of lectures is not permitted, alternative arrangements to recording should be discussed between the professors and student.

Student Agreement

  1. Use the recorded files only for personal study and for NO other purposes.
  2. DO NOT, under any circumstances, distribute or share the recording with any other individual, in any format, without obtaining, the prior written consent of the professor.
  3. Respect the professor’s decision to prohibit recording of classes or portions of classes which may involve personal discussion and self-disclosure. In such a case, the student will work with their professor to discuss alternative arrangements. Students should focus their recording devices on course material being presented by the instructor and record or capture in a manner that ensures the privacy of other students present.
  4. Understand that the information contained in the recording is protected under federal and international copyright legislation.
  5. Do not publish or quote any lecture material without the professor’s explicit written consent and without properly identifying and crediting the professor.
  6. Failure to comply with this agreement may be considered a violation of any applicable Mohawk College policy including the Student Behaviour Policy.